LETTER: Regional policing isn’t the answer

The cry for a regional police force is all about power and control. And nothing but a knee-jerk reaction to the Missing Women’s report.

To the editor;

The recent cry for a regional police force is all about power and control. And nothing but a knee-jerk reaction to the Missing Women’s report.

Nothing would change. All the missing women were reported missing to the Vancouver Police. They were the prime investigators and it was their responsibility and no one else’s. They say there would be better communication, but they already have a compatible computer system that all Lower Mainland and BC police can access for information and communication. Do you for one minute think that, say, Vancouver district would care what is happening in Surrey district? All districts, as now, would be working on different radio channels but could switch over as needed.

You could end up with Gregor Robertson being in charge and we know his track record. His priority would be Vancouver first.

Kash Heed says that the initial start up cost would be expensive but would even out down the road. I fail to see how this would happen.

Vancouver and Surrey are almost equal in population (with Surrey soon to pass Vancouver). Surrey has a bigger geographical area than Vancouver.

Vancouver Police have in the area of 1,450 members, given their union staffing levels.Surrey RCMP have in the area of 650 members and no union.

By going to regional policing Surrey would then have to follow union staffing rules for their population, which could mean hiring 800 to 1,000 new police officers. They would then lose the 10 per cent federal funding. They would have to pay for training, equipment, benefits and increased support services. Now multiply this by five other detachments.

So I fail to see how Mr. Heed sees this as being cheaper. No. It is all about power and control for Mr. Heed and nothing would change except a large increase in your property taxes.

Mr. J. Edwards

Surrey