Waterstock Properties is seeking to build 114 residential units near 16 Avenue and 157 Street. This Urban Arts Architecture rendering, included in a City of Surrey planning report, provides a view of the proposed development looking south on 157 Street towards 16 Avenue. (Urban Arts Architecture rendering)

Waterstock Properties is seeking to build 114 residential units near 16 Avenue and 157 Street. This Urban Arts Architecture rendering, included in a City of Surrey planning report, provides a view of the proposed development looking south on 157 Street towards 16 Avenue. (Urban Arts Architecture rendering)

Public hearing April 12 for South Surrey apartment, townhouse plan

Waterstock Properties is proposing buildings of six and four storeys near Earl Marriott Secondary

Semiahmoo Peninsula residents will have opportunity to weigh in on two six-storey apartment buildings and a four-storey stacked townhouse building proposed for property near 157 Street and 16 Avenue on April 12.

According to City of Surrey documents, Waterstock Properties is asking for amendments to the city’s Official Community Plan (OCP) as well as to the city’s Stage 1 Semiahmoo Town Centre Plan, to permit development of 114 residential units on seven lots.

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The proposed development is anticipated to be ready for occupancy by January 2023, if approved, on land at 15719 and 15729 16 Ave., and from 1634-1672 157 St. – immediately west of Earl Marriott Secondary.

A city planning report notes the sought-after OCP amendment is in keeping with the Stage 1 Semiahmoo TCP – endorsed by council in March 2020 – and, that the amendments will be proposed when the Stage 2 Semiahmoo TCP is brought to council, anticipated for fall 2021.

As well, the proposed density reflects the site’s location adjacent to a proposed ‘Medical District,’ which includes properties west of the subject property that are designated for ‘Mid-Rise Medical Mixed Use,’ up to 12 storeys, the report adds.

It also notes that the Stage 1 plan allows staff to receive and process development applications for properties within the plan area, provided the applications do not proceed to final approval until a completed Stage 2 plan is approved by council.

Staff have recommended that council introduce bylaws to amend the OCP and rezone the site, and authorize staff to draft a development permit.

Issues to be resolved include a finalized tree survey and statement regarding tree preservation; demolition of existing buildings and structures; provision of a density bonus amenity contribution in support of the request for increased density on the north portion of the site; and submission of an acoustical report for the units adjacent to 16 Avenue, as well as registration of a restrictive covenant to ensure implementation of noise-mitigation measures.

The applicant is also proposing to purchase a portion of 157 Street to be incorporated into the site, and to convey a portion of 15699 16 Ave. to the city for the proposed realignment of that roadway with White Rock’s Lee Street. The realignment would allow for a “full-movement signalized intersection at this location,” the planning report notes.

Concerns cited in responses to notification letters sent out last September included the proposed height and density, increase in traffic, safety for children walking to school and “unsightliness/vandalism issues on properties owned by the applicant.”

Regarding the latter, the report notes the applicant is responding by demolishing vacant houses and erecting fencing to keep trespassers out. They are also working with the city’s bylaw and fire departments to address concerns, and have been advised to ensure contracting crews abide by the city’s noise and construction hours.

The project was initially proposed to encompass approximately 30 properties.

Of 56 mature trees on the scaled-down site, two would be retained and the applicant has proposed to plant 72 replacements – 36 short of the city’s required two-to-one ratio. The deficit would require a cash-in-lieu payment of $14,400 ($400 per tree) to the Green City Fund, the report states.

The public hearing had initially been planned for March 8, however, due to a notification error, it was deemed out of order and removed from the agenda.

Residents wishing to speak at the hearing via telephone may register between noon and 5 p.m. on April 12, by calling 604-591-4132.

Comments may also be submitted via email to clerks@surrey.ca or by mail to Mayor and Council, 13450 104 Ave. Surrey, V3T1V8.



tholmes@peacearchnews.com
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