Norm Lipinski is Surrey’s new police chief.

Norm Lipinski is Surrey’s new police chief.

Policing

‘A clean canvas’: Norm Lipinski named as Surrey’s police chief

He says it’s ‘the best job in policing in Canada right now’

Norm Lipinski has been named Surrey’s Chief Constable of the Surrey Police Service.

Lipinski, who has more than 25 years of experience, will be taking on the role in the coming weeks, according to a release from the Surrey Police Board Friday (Nov. 20).

“I think it’s fair to say that we are in a new era of policing, and what that means to me first and foremost, is a community policing model,” said Lipinski, adding that he started in Edmonton where “essentially, I cut my teeth on developing and implementing a very community-based, strong community-based policing model.”

He said he then worked with the RCMP where he learned about “relationship policing.”

Lipinski has most recently served as deputy chief of the Delta Police Department and is a former assistant commissioner for the RCMP’s E-Division in B.C. He was also chairman of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police’s ethics committee and participated in the first-ever study of ethics in Canadian policing, which started in 2009, that included a national survey with over 10,000 respondents in 31 Canadian police services, as well as 80 interviews and a literature review.

Carleton University’s Dr. Stephen Maguire and Dr. Lorraine Dyke conducted the study, with financial support from CACP and the Sheldon Chumir Foundation for Ethics in Leadership.

“Police chiefs across the country wanted a comprehensive look at evolving issues, like the importance of supervisory support, as well as answers to the tough questions such as how the front line feels about the behavioral integrity of their colleagues,” Lipinski said in 2012. “The goal was to provide a benchmark for all police forces, and guidelines on how we might better structure policing.”

The Delta Police website describes Lipinski as an “accomplished police leader” who served with the Edmonton Police Service before leaving, at the rank of deputy chief to serve as Assistant Commissioner with the RCMP, as district commander for the Lower Mainland.

Lipinski was also the Criminal Operations Officer for E-Division for five years and spent “a great deal of his time” in uniform and operations. He was also deputy chief in charge of human resources, information technology, training, and finance in the Edmonton Police Service.

“Deputy Chief Lipinski has built a strong reputation as a credible and collaborative leader who is grounded in the philosophies of community policing and service to the public,” DPD’s website states. “He has a proven track record for progressive police practices, community engagement, and positive labour relations. A hallmark of his success has been the building of strong teams. Deputy Chief Lipinski has developed highly effective strategies that have played a major role in crime reduction and led organizational reviews in diverse areas of policing including use of force.”

Lipinski is a recipient of the Officer Order of Merit (OOM) bestowed by the Governor General of Canada, the Canadian Police Exemplary Medal, the Alberta Law Enforcement Long Service Medal and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal.

He holds a Master of Business Administration degree as well as a Bachelor of Laws degree.

The board said Lipinski was selected through a “rigorous process led by a third-party professional search firm and vetted through objective decision-making criteria framework that placed particular emphasis on leadership experience, demonstrable experience promoting progressive policing policies, including commitment to de-escalation training and ability to foster a diverse and inclusive environment.”

Asked why he wanted the job, Lipinski said, “I think it’s the best job in policing in Canada right now.”

“The ability to, I’ll say, have a clean canvas and build the police department with the community, I think is very, very attractive,” he said. “I have a certain vision, a certain model in mind. But before I do anything, it will be consultation with the police board and consultation with the community.”

He added that consultation will include all levels of government, businesses, faith leaders, the Indigenous community and more.

Mayor Doug McCallum, who is also the police board chair, said Lipinski will bring Surrey into a “new era of modern and progressive policing while staying attuned to the priorities of this growing community.”

“In this time of global pandemic and rising awareness of diversity, representation and equity in policing, Surrey Police will have a leader who understands the challenges before us and has the expertise and the skills to take us into a new era.”

Asked if Lipinski’s background with the RCMP contradicts his wishes for a municipal police force, McCallum said it was a “huge advantage,” adding that it’s a “transition period” and both forces will have to work together “for the safety of Surrey.”

READ ALSO: Surrey’s top cop blindsided by $45M-budget reduction, says memo obtained by ‘Now-Leader’, Nov. 19, 2020

Lipinski said his background with the RCMP will potentially help to ease the transition.

“It’s important when you do a transition of this nature to be able to work closely together and understand the processes on either side of the fence. In doing that, it’s very difficult. It’s a different system. It’s a federal system and having the advantage of understanding that will facilitate and speed up the transition.”

Meantime, the Surrey RCMP’s assistant commissioner Brian Edwards released a statement Friday, congratulating Lipinski.

“Today I was advised, along with the media and the public, that the police chief has been named for the Surrey Police Service,” said Edwards.

“It is important for all Surrey residents to know that, at this time, the RCMP continues to maintain responsibility for policing in Surrey. The transition of police services is a long and complex process, particularly for a detachment of our size.”

Edwards said the Surrey RCMP will “continue to manage operations until the Municipal Police Unit Agreement has been terminated or replaced with another agreement.”

“There is no doubt that this continuing process to transition Surrey’s policing service has been challenging for our people. They are dedicated police officers and support staff, many of who live and raise their families in Surrey,” he said. “For the past two years, they have continued to do their jobs with professionalism, integrity, and compassion, while working under a cloud of uncertainty for their personal and professional futures. I am proud to lead such a dedicated group of individuals.

“To the residents of Surrey, please feel confident that your safety remains our top priority as we move through this.”

homelessphoto



edit@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

THE REAL PHOTO: Linda Annis, executive director with Metro Vancouver Crime Stoppers holds a note commonly posted on doors when people go on vacation. (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Surrey councillor slams mayor’s slate for doctoring her photo, quote in social media attack ad

Linda Annis says the Safe Surrey Coalition has been running “fake news” and a doctored photo of her in an attack ad on the slate’s twitter account and its Facebook page.

The City Centre 1 building is part of Surrey Health and Technology District, adjacent to Surrey Memorial Hospital. (submitted photo)
Maritimes city plans Health and Technology District similar to Surrey’s

Surrey-based Lark Group involved in the public-private-academic partnership

The City of White Rock is warning residents to be careful about unscheduled doorstep calls, after reports of salespeople misrepresenting themselves as city workers conducting water tests. STOCK IMAGE
City of White Rock warns of bogus water test visits

Residents report salespeople ‘give impression’ they are municipal employees

Semiahmoo Secondary senior girls basketball team members (left to right) Deja Lee, Tara Wallack and Izzy Forsyth sign their official NCAA commitments at an event earlier this month. (Contributed photo)
Semiahmoo Secondary holds signing-day ceremony for three NCAA-bound basketball stars

Deja Lee, Tara Wallack and Izzy Forsyth committed to U.S. universities earlier this year

The Right Reverend Peter Klenner, pastor of All Saints Community Church (and Bishop of the Anglican Mission in Canada). Contributed photo
Purchase aims to restore historic Crescent Beach landmark

All Saints Church fundraising to buy Holy Cross, retain it as ‘sacred space’

Kyle Charles poses for a photo in Edmonton on Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. Marvel Entertainment, the biggest comic book publisher in the world, hired the 34-year-old First Nations illustrator as one of the artists involved in Marvel Voice: Indigenous Voices #1 in August. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
VIDEO: Indigenous illustrator of new Marvel comic hopes Aboriginal women feel inspired

Kyle Charles says Indigenous women around the world have reached out

B.C. Liberal MLA Shirley Bond questions NDP government ministers in the B.C. legislature, Feb. 19, 2020. (Hansard TV)
Cabinet veteran Shirley Bond chosen interim leader of B.C. Liberals

28-member opposition prepares for December legislature session

Motorists wait to enter a Fraser Health COVID-19 testing facility, in Surrey, B.C., on Monday, November 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
COVID-19: What do rising positivity rates mean for B.C.? It’s not entirely clear

Coronavirus cases are on the rise but the province has not unveiled clear thresholds for further measures

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A rider carves a path on Yanks Peak Saturday, Nov. 21. Two men from Prince George went missing on the mountain the next day. One of them, Colin Jalbert, made it back after digging out his sled from four feet under the snow. The other, Mike Harbak, is still missing. Local search and rescue teams went out looking Monday, Nov. 23. (Sam Fait Photo)
‘I could still be the one out there’: Snowmobiler rescued, 1 missing on northern B.C. mountain

As Quesnel search and rescue teams search for the remaining rider, Colin Jalbert is resting at home

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

More than 70 anglers participated in the bar-fishing demonstration fishery on Sept. 9, 2020 on the Fraser River near Chilliwack. DFO officers ticketed six people and seized four rods. A court date is set for Dec. 1, 2020. (Jennifer Feinberg/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Anglers ticketed in Fraser River demonstration fishery heading to court

Sportfishing groups started a GoFundMe with almost $20K so far for legal defence of six anglers

Care home staff are diligent about wearing personal protective equipment when they are in contact with residents, but less so when they interact with other staff members, B.C. Seniors Advocate says. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
More COVID-19 testing needed for senior home staff, B.C.’s advocate says

Employees mingling spotted as virus conductor in many workplaces

This 2019 photo provided by The ALS Association shows Pat Quinn. Quinn, a co-founder of the viral ice bucket challenge, died Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020, at the age of 37. (Scott Kauffman/The ALS Association via AP)
Co-founder of viral ALS Ice Bucket Challenge dies at 37

Pat Quinn was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in 2013

Most Read