British Columbians who have been enjoying takeout beer, wine and liquor will now be able to order the service permanently – thanks to regulations implemented Friday by the province. (Pexels.com/Engin Akyurt)

British Columbians who have been enjoying takeout beer, wine and liquor will now be able to order the service permanently – thanks to regulations implemented Friday by the province. (Pexels.com/Engin Akyurt)

B.C. now permanently allows takeout, delivery liquor service from restaurants

The change was made Friday, at the recommendation of industry professionals

British Columbians who have been enjoying takeout beer, wine and liquor will now be able to order the service permanently – thanks to regulations implemented Friday by the province.

It comes after a recommendation from B.C. liquor and hospitality industry professionals and advocates with Restaurants Canada.

Minister of Public Safety Mike Farnworth said the change will provide around 8,000 businesses long-term financial support and “certainty,” aiding the hospitality industry in its recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Last year the province granted three temporary authorizations, offering restaurants the option to sell liquor with food orders for pickup and delivery – now, the allowance is permanent.

READ MORE: B.C. liquor sales to be cut off early for St. Patrick’s Day

“Announcements like this give businesses the flexibility they need to shift their operations for the long-term, helping them to regain stability,” stated Ravi Kahlon, Minister of Jobs, Economic Recovery and Innovation.

This is the second temporary authorization the provincial government has instated permanently.

In February 2021, restaurants, bars and tourism operators with liquor licenses were allowed to purchase alcohol at wholesale prices permanently.

RELATED: Pubs, restaurants to pay wholesale prices on liquor permanently in COVID-recovery

“We’ve had to make huge adjustments to our businesses, shifting to a takeout and delivery-focused business model to ensure we could continue to operate under the provincial health officer’s guidelines,” said Ian Tostenson, president of the BC Restaurant and Foodservices Association.

“The temporary change initially helped us generate sales through a new revenue stream, but making it permanent will give us continued relief from the financial hardship of the pandemic as we move into recovery.”



sarah.grochowski@bpdigital.ca

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