Average Surrey household to see $154.07 tax increase in 2018

This past year’s tax increase for the average Surrey household was $137

SURREY — The average Surrey household can expect to see a $154.07 increase in taxes in 2018 with new city and Metro rates combined.

Surrey’s 2018 proposed rate increase works out to $124.61, or 3.8 per cent. In 2017, the grand total amount was $3,259.85, taking utilities like water, sewer, drainage, dyking, flooding and garbage collection into account ($1,206.85) and property tax ($2,053). There was also the $568.28 secondary suite fee, if applicable, which is expected to increase by $22.16 in 2018 for a total of $590.44.

In 2018, Surrey’s tax increase is expected to include a $12.92 utilities increase and $111.69 property increase, coupled with Metro’s $29.46 utilities increase. The grand total tax increase for the average Surrey household in 2018 will be $3,413.92.

That’s based on an assessed value of $1,030,922 for an average single-family dwelling, according to the City of Surrey.

This past year’s tax increase for the average Surrey household was $137, based on an assessed value of $720,400 for the average single-family dwelling in this city. Within that hike, the property tax increase was $72, or 3.9 per cent.

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In 2015, the average single family home in Surrey was valued at $671,000. Taxes increased by $88 on average for 2016, from $1,771 to $1,859.

This past year’s tax increase for the average Surrey household was $137, based on an assessed value of $720,400 for the average single-family dwelling in this city. Within that hike, the property tax increase was $72, or 3.9 per cent.

In 2015 the average single family home in Surrey was valued at $671,000. Taxes increased by $88 on average for 2016, from $1,771 to $1,859.

“It’s pretty consistent with what we’ve done in previous years,” Surrey City Councillor Tom Gill, an accountant and chairman of the finance committee, said of the plan.

“It’s pretty consistent with last year’s numbers. I think that it would be fair to suggest that a significant portion is going towards public safety, in terms of enhancing that element, whether it’s a combination of police, fire and bylaws, I think that’s where much of the cost structures are sitting.”

Surrey City Councillor Tom Gill, chairman of the city’s finance committee. (Photo: Now-Leader)

The city proposes to hire four more firefighters in 2018 and 12 more RCMP officers, bringing the detachment’s total force to 843 officers, with 12 more Mounties to be added each year in 2019, 2020, 2021 and 2022. Moreover, the 2018 financial plan aims to cover funding for three bylaws enforcement officers added in 2017 as well as hiring two new bylaws officers, two new community patrol officers and two public safety support manager positions in 2018.

The matter went before the city’s finance committee on Monday.

“It was really just an opportunity for the public to provide any feedback,” Gill said. “We have some great feedback.”

The Surrey Board of Trade made recommendations to the committee, mayor and council on Monday.

“We gave a very high-level overview of the Surrey Board of Trade’s perspective on the City of Surrey Financial Plan for 2018,” said Anita Huberman, CEO of the board.

“We want to ensure that investments for Surrey’s business community are created for our local economy for today and for the future.”

Huberman said the board monitors public-sector spending in an effort to “maximize productivity in the economy and encourage growth in the private sector.

“The city budget is important to the Surrey Board of Trade to evaluate Surrey’s tax rates as being conducive for business growth and retention, and infrastructure investments.”

Council must still approve the financial plan.

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