A Surrey Crime Prevention Society volunteer works with local youth during a Community Safety Tour.

Many ways you can help vulnerable youth get on the right track

Surrey Crime Prevention Society looks to reignite youth-at-risk mentorship program

A program with proven success in engaging at-risk youth in Surrey in positive activities and steering them away from negative behaviours needs your help.

You’ve no doubt seen Surrey Crime Prevention Society volunteers in their green jackets delivering such programs as Speedwatch throughout the City, and the Lock Out Auto Crime and Citizen’s Community Safety Tours.

What you may not know is this charity also works hard to connect vulnerable youth with trained mentors (university students). They volunteer side by side and experience the sense of pride by contributing to their community and gaining valuable skills.

Despite the solid track record of the Community Safety Youth Mentorship Program, funding challenges have put this successful initiative on hold, at least for now, says executive director Karen Reid Sidhu.

And that’s where you come in.

Mentorships produce positive outcomes

“Vulnerable youth in our communities need our support,” she says, noting that your donations could help reinstate this worthwhile program. “We’ve had three years of getting excellent results. We’ve seen kids who have gone back to school, or enrolled in post-secondary after being influenced by our dedicated mentors.”

So what makes this concept work so well? Matching up enthusiastic and well-trained leadership mentors with at-risk youth, who learn about and participate with their mentor in programs ranging from community safety tours to traffic safety, plus special events and projects.

“It gives the kids a sense of what it’s like to make a difference,” Reid Sidhu says. “Plus they experience a positive interaction with law enforcement and fellow volunteers, which gives them a whole new perspective on being part of the community while making a difference.”

A related program called Civic Pride, launched last year and supported by Envision First West Financial and the Trigate Properties Group, sees crime prevention volunteers work with Grade 7 students, educating them on the value of giving back and understanding the value of civic pride.

Volunteers help keep your community safer

Over the past three years, Surrey Crime Prevention Society volunteers have contributed 95,000 hours delivering a variety of programs. As part of that service, they’ve supported the community through recovering stolen vehicles, ensuring our roads are safe for children by monitoring speeds and distracted driving in school and playground zones, and reminded you that leaving items in your vehicle increases the risk of it being broken into.

Here’s some of that work by the numbers (year-to-date 2018, unless otherwise stated):

  • 46 – The number of stolen vehicles found and reported to police
  • 385 – Total calls for service initiated by volunteers to police, fire, Transit Police and city bylaw departments
  • 85,000 – vehicles targeted with Lock Out Auto Crime information
  • 450,000 – The number of vehicles checked in Speedwatch zones near school and playgrounds in the past two years; a full 25 per cent were found to be speeding, which led to police enforcement in those areas

*****

Through the generosity of a City of Surrey grant, gaming funds and private donations, these programs continue to produce outstanding results. And with community support, Surrey Crime Prevention Society will be able to reintroduce the Community Safety Youth Mentorship Program.

If you’d like to help financially, you can do so online. Interested volunteers can find the forms here and you can follow the society on Facebook. You can contact them directly at 604-502-8555 or visit their office on 82nd Avenue in Surrey.

 

Surrey Crime Prevention Society volunteers wear the familiar green jackets out on a Community Safety Tour.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Mother’s death causes singer to cancel Surrey Fusion Festival performance

Revised schedule released with Mankirt Aulakh replacing Sharry Mann

New day camp for Surrey children living with cancer, blood disorders

West Coast Kids Cancer Foundation running another session at Surrey school

Cars keyed on BC Ferries after alarms bother dog on board

Delta police arrested one passenger on suspicion of mischief

TONIGHT: Eagle Eyes to headline Concerts for the Pier in White Rock

East Beach event to feature The Fab Fourever

Toilet, bathtub among junk dumped behind Scott Road thrift store, costing operators money

‘I wish people would appreciate what we do, and not dump their stuff,’ frustrated manager says

Feds lowered poverty line, reducing the number of seniors in need: documents

Liberals introduced a poverty line that was below the prior low-income cutoff

BCHL: Alberni Valley Bulldogs have been sold

Victoria company has purchased BCHL team, but will keep it in Port Alberni

“Does Kirby care?” B.C. First Nation’s group using geo-targeted ads in Houston, Texas for justice

The Heiltsuk Tribal Council has called out Kirby Corporation for the Nathan E. Stewart oil spill

Trudeau announces $79M investment for 118 more public transit buses across B.C.

Contributions from municipal to federal level to fund more buses in a bid to cut commutes

B.C. woman wins record $2.1 million on casino slot machine

‘That night was so surreal … I wasn’t able to sleep or eat for the first two days,’ she said

After B.C. dad’s death, Technical Safety BC wants changes to trampoline park rules

Jay Greenwood, 46, did ‘a series of acrobatic manoeuvres prior to a fall that caused serious injury and cardiac arrest’

$900M settlement reached in class action on sexual misconduct in Canadian military

After facing criticism, the government moved to begin settlement proceedings in early 2018

Tax take stays ahead of increased B.C. government spending

Tax revenue $2.1 billion higher than budget in 2018-19

Two toddler siblings found drowned on First Nation in Alberta

The siblings were found drowned on their family’s property, according to RCMP

Most Read