(Photo: twitter.com/CPAC_TV)

Federal election

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau outlines education promises at SFU Surrey

Trudeau spoke about the Liberals’ plan to ‘make education more affordable for students’

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau stopped at SFU Surrey on Friday (Oct. 11) to highlight the party’s education platform ahead of the Oct. 21 federal election.

“It’s great to be back in Surrey on the first day of advanced polls to talk about what a re-elected Liberal government will do to help young people get ahead,” Trudeau said to open his talk in Surrey.

Trudeau focused on the Liberals’ plan to “make education more affordable for students,” noting that many young people are forced to take loans and get a job to help pay for tuition, textbook, rent and other bills.

A re-elected Liberal government, Trudeau said, would introduce a two-year grace period for the repayment of student loans following graduation.

“That means no payments and no interest when you first enter the job market,” said Trudeau.

After that, Trudeau said a Liberal government would ensure new grads wouldn’t have to start repaying their loans until they’re earning at least $35,000 a year and if their income ever falls below this level, their payments would be put on hold.

Trudeau also highlighted the Liberal promise to cut cell phone bills by 25 per cent.

(Trudeau begins speaking at the roughly 16 minute mark in the video)

The Liberals promise that if re-elected they would increase Canada Student Grants, reduce interest costs on Canada Student Loans, improve the repayment assistance program, and give “more help” to adult students and people receiving EI, according to campaign literature.

The party also promises to establish a “more generous” Canada Student Grants and more affordable and flexible student loans.

“We will give full- and part-time students up to $1,200 more per year, through increased Canada Student Grants,” notes the party’s platform.

New parents would also be allowed to “pause” their student loan repayments, interest-free, until their youngest child reached the age of five. New parents who have graduated but haven’t yet finished paying off their student loans would also be enabled to “hit pause” until their child turns five.

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