Whalley’s Flamingo Hotel in 1960. (Photo: Surrey Archives/Stan McKinnon collection)

Whalley’s Flamingo Hotel in 1960. (Photo: Surrey Archives/Stan McKinnon collection)

‘Whalley Before Skyscrapers’ talk to focus on archival photos, plus video from 1993

Surrey Archives boasts more than 60,000 archival photographs available online

A virtual talk hosted by Surrey Archives staff will focus on “Whalley Before Skyscrapers.”

The free online event will offer a look at local landmarks including the Flamingo Hotel, Stardust roller skating rink, Round Up Café, Surrey Place Mall, K-Mart and the Rickshaw restaurant.

“Participants will experience the rapid growth of this area over the last few decades, including photos and stories that document the rise of Surrey’s City Centre,” says an event advisory.

The hour-long talk is on Thursday, May 13, starting at 6:30 p.m. on Microsoft Teams.

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“Whalley’s landscape has changed dramatically,” said archivist Chelsea Bailey. “This talk provides a unique opportunity to see the area through archival photos over the years. A major highlight will be archival video footage from 1993.”

Surrey Archives’ in-person programs are on pause due to COVID-19. This spring, two additional virtual talks are “In Their Own Words” (May 27) and “The Surrey Leader Collection” (June 24).

Registration for “Whalley Before Skyscrapers” opened Friday, April 30. To reserve a spot, call 604-501-5100, sign in to a MySurrey account, or email archives@surrey.ca.

Surrey Archives boasts more than 60,000 archival photographs available online, as well as free online heritage tools, via surrey.ca/archives.

• RELATED STORY/PHOTOS: Surrey’s old Stardust building demolished to make way for 49-storey tower.

VIDEO: Surrey’s former Flamingo Hotel goes out with a bang.

Winding down at the Round Up: Friday is Surrey diner’s final day.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

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