Trivia clues at numbered posts along the maze route lead the way out of the Bose Corn Maze.

Surrey’s Bose Family Corn Maze opens Saturday

It's time to get lost in the maze, and have a great time finding your way out again as the popular Cloverdale attraction gets set to open

It’s time to get lost in the maze.

The Bose Corn Maze – Cloverdale’s number one agricultural attraction – opens for the season on Saturday (Aug. 26), set to amuse and confuse a new crop of visitors with its labyrinth of ripening corn.

Sprawling across acres of dense corn rows on a field at the corner of 64 Avenue and 156 Street, the family-run attraction sports a different pattern every year that’s best seen from above.

The 2016 maze pays tribute to the family’s – and the nation’s – passion for rugby.

“We attended the Rugby Sevens (tournament) back in March,” says Novi Bose, who operates the maze along with husband Mike and their sons . “It was so much fun. So why not Rugby Canada?”

Not surprisingly, they were thrilled when the nation’s Women’s Rugby Sevens team won the bronze medal at the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

“Only thing that could be better, is if we could have put that into the corn field,” she said.

http://webpapersadmin.bcnewsgroup.com/portals/uploads/cloverdale/.DIR288/wBoseMaze.jpgThe entrance to the maze (pictured) is located on 156 Street, one block south of 64 Avenue.

Be sure to give yourself plenty of time to complete the maze, which can take up to two and a half hours to successfully navigate.

Clues posted along the maze help point to the correct route. Trivia buffs have a distinct advantage.

Other features include a hay jump, pumpkin patch and a fire pit where visitors can roast marshmallows after they’ve found their way out.

The Bose family farm started in 1891 when Henry Bose landed in B.C. from England, starting a new life as a dairy and potato farmer.

The fifth generation farming family continues to put food on the dinner tables of Surrey, raising poultry and growing a variety of field crops that are sold at farmers markets across the region.

When the maze and pumpkin patch are open, Bose potatoes, carrots, lettuce, kale, corn, peppers and tomatoes are sold at the concession, as are refreshments.

In August to Labour Day, hours of operation for the maze are noon to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, and from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, noon to 8 p.m. Saturday, and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday.

From Labour Day to Oct. 16, hours of operation are Thursday and Friday from 6 to 8 p.m., Saturday from noon to 8 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Monday to Wednesday are reserved for groups of 20 or more.

Over the years, they’ve tried to keep admission prices low enough for young families to enjoy the maze – and learn where their food comes from.

Admission: $7 general admission, $5 child (free for children aged 4 and under), $23 for a family of four. Cash and debit only.

At night, bring your flashlight or wear a headlamp. Boots are also recommended if the ground is damp and when it’s raining.

For up-to-date information on maze conditions, call the hotline at 778-578-5450.

Group bookings are available after Labour Day by emailing bosemaze@hotmail.com

Visit BoseCornMaze.com

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