Delta Naturalists Society has released a series of new brochures aimed at helping residents learn more about the plants and wildlife that call Delta home. (Delta Naturalists Society/submitted photo)

Delta Naturalists Society has released a series of new brochures aimed at helping residents learn more about the plants and wildlife that call Delta home. (Delta Naturalists Society/submitted photo)

Local flora and fauna focus of new Delta Naturalists brochures

The pamphlets cover ‘every variety of local animal and plant, large and small’

Delta Naturalists Society has released a series of new brochures aimed at helping residents learn more about the plants and wildlife that call Delta home.

The brochures, which were all created by society volunteers, cover “every variety of local animal and plant, large and small,” according to a press release, and feature full-colour pictures and key information about each one.

”These brochures are a handy resource for nature-lovers, students, photographers, gardeners and backyard naturalists,” the release states. “Each title offers information about our natural world in an easy-to-read, portable package. See if you and your family can find all the species in each brochure!”

Animals in Delta introduces some of Delta’s key mammals, reptiles and amphibians, including deer, coyotes, moles and voles, bats, seals and whales, while Intertidal Life in Delta looks at life along our shores, such as clams, jellyfish, crabs and seaweeds.

Bugs in Delta presents some of Delta’s spiders, bees, flies, grasshoppers and other bugs, while Damselflies & Dragonflies in Delta features 36 species of these fascinating and confusing flying insects, with flight times and tips on identifying male from female.

Butterflies & Moths in Delta illustrates 38 of the most likely members of these two families to be found in local habitats, and gives details of what plant species attract them. And speaking of local flora, Flowering Plants in Delta focuses on the diversity of plants observed in Boundary Bay Regional Park and along the dykes, as well as elsewhere across Delta.

The six new brochures add to the society’s previous two publications, Birds in Delta and Experience Birding in Delta, and volunteers are hard at work producing two more: Woodland Plants in Delta and Fungi in Delta.

The brochures are available free at Delta’s libraries, recreation centres, city hall and other locations. They can also be downloaded from the Delta Naturalists Society website (dncb.wordpress.com/dns-brochures).

The brochure project was made with financial support from the City of Delta, Pacific Parklands Foundation, the BC Naturalists Foundation and the Delta Naturalists Society.

Delta Naturalists Society is a federated member of BC Nature formed in 1988, composed of nature enthusiasts, birdwatchers and conservationists who work to promote the protection and conservation of nature and biodiversity in the Delta area.

The society holds monthly meetings and regular nature outings, and can be found attending community events as “nature’s ambassadors in Delta.” The society also works with Delta City Council on its Birds and Biodiversity Conservation Strategy.

For more information about the Delta Naturalists Society, visit dncb.wordpress.com or check them out on Facebook (@DeltaNats).



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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