Visitors to the 2014 Bose Corn Maze in Cloverdale make use of a viewing structure to find their way out of the labyrinth.

Last week to find your way out of the Bose Corn Maze

It’s become part of the fabric of Surrey, and if you haven’t yet been, you’ve only got a few days left to experience the Bose Corn Maze.

It’s become part of the fabric of Surrey, and if you haven’t yet been, you’ve only got a few days left to experience the Bose Corn Maze.

The popular Cloverdale attraction closes for the season on Thanksgiving Monday (Oct. 13).

Spread across 17 acres amid 12-feet high rows, it’s one of the region’s largest corn mazes, and certainly its most challenging. Set on one of Surrey’s original farms, it’s been a harvest tradition since 1999, when the Bose family seized on a maze as a way to connect Surreyites with their city’s agricultural roots.

Since then, it’s entertained countless visitors, and played host to fashion shoots and movie productions, weddings, and corporate events.

The stalks are planted to form an elaborate design that’s not discernible at ground level.

http://webpapersadmin.bcnewsgroup.com/portals/uploads/cloverdale/.DIR288/wBoseMaze2014.jpgThis year’s maze pays tribute to the Vancouver Whitecaps soccer team, incorporating both the image of a soccer ball and the Whitecaps FC logo.

“It’s just whatever strikes us,” Mike Bose once told The Reporter. “We love to call it Canada’s biggest piece of art.”

The corn maze is located on land that was farmed by Henry Bose in 1891, when he landed in B.C. and decided he wanted to live in Surrey.

Today, the farm raises field crops and poultry, along with running the corn maze.

The maze is divided into two parts, and visitors have to navigate through both sides in order to find the exit.

Clues are planted at intersections in the form of multiple-choice questions.

There are two raised viewpoints along the way, providing maze-goers with a vantage point above the corn rows to help find the exit.

Operating hours are Thursday and Friday from 6-8 p.m., Saturdays from noon to 8 p.m., and Sundays and holiday Mondays from noon to 4 p.m.

The last ticket sold is at closing time, and everyone is given an opportunity to finish the maze.

Visitors are advised to bring a flashlight or to use the light app on their phone.

Other attractions include a pumpkin patch and anyone who has successfully navigated their way out of the maze are invited to roast marshmallows by the fire once they’re done. The farm also sells vegetables.

The entrance is located off 156 Street at 62 Avenue.

Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for kids aged 5 to 18, $4 children, $6 seniors aged 65 and up, and $23 for a family of four. Cash or cheque only.

For information, call 778-578-5450, visit www.BoseCornMaze.com or email bosemaze@hotmail.com.

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