The Surrey Board of Trade has submitted recommendations on gaming revenues

Board of Trade submits gaming plan

Better allocation of funds to charities part of the mix

Surrey’s business leaders have submitted recommendations to the Community Gaming Grant Review, with an eye to better fund local charities, not-for-profits, community groups, local government and others.

The Surrey Board of Trade’s recommendations included the following points:

• Amend the Gaming Control Act to permit the General Manager to dedicate annually an amount equal to 30 per cent of the gaming funds deposited to general revenue to qualified charities.

•  Reinstitute the policy of three-year grants, which will reduce the administrative burden on both the charities and the Gaming Policy and Enforcement Branch.

•  The General Manager adjusts the local and provincial caps on the amount a charity can receive in accordance with the projected three year funding levels.  Right now there are Societies who will be experiencing a considerable cut to their gaming grant as the result of the $100,000 local cap and the $250,000 provincial cap.

•  The Gaming Control Act be amended to permit the General Manager to dedicate annually an amount equal to 2 per cent of the gaming funds deposited to general revenue to the development of social entrepreneurship and that this money be granted to enterprising non profits, a portion to be for distribution to qualified not for profits to develop a social enterprise to provide sustainable income and a portion to provide educational programs to assist these charities in the development of a social enterprise.

The Surrey Board of Trade also concerned about the section in the Gaming Control Act that permits the minister to “issue written directives to the lottery corporation on matters of general policy.”

The provision to make these directives available through the Gaming Policy and Enforcement Branch during business hours is not providing sufficient oversight.  The Regulations direct the General Manager to post these directives on the web site for 12 months.  We would suggest that these directives after the 12-month period be available for public consultation through an accessible archive section on the web site.

The Surrey Board of Trade recognizes not for profits not only for their good work but for their economic benefit as well.