Indigenous reconcilliation

Semiahmoo First Nation councillor Joanne Charles sings during an opening ceremony as her mother, Mabel Charles, an SFN elder and residential school survivor, watches. (Josh Hornak contributed photo)

SFN-hosted panel on reconciliation, diversity and equality a call to action

Participants urged to work toward overcoming unconscious bias

 

An Indigenous dancer performs in the Elbow River Camp at the Calgary Stampede in Calgary, Alta., Wednesday, July 14, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

‘Miss the drumbeat’: Return of powwow season welcomed by First Nations

‘Everybody just wanted to powwow (to) renew their spirits and lift themselves up’

 

Frank Bucholtz

COLUMN: Surrey has far to go in its relationship with First Nations

City’s deep Indigenous roots are barely visible

  • Jul 15, 2021

 

A panel discussion on reconciliation, diversity and equality, dubbed a ‘Re-tooling’ is set for 6 p.m. at the Spirit Stage in Semiahmoo Park. It begins at 6 p.m. on Monday, July 12. Admission is free but registration is required. (unsplash.com photo)

White Rock ‘Re-tooling’ panel to discuss reconciliation, diversity and equality

Monday night event at Spirit Stage in Semiahmoo Park is free and open to all

A panel discussion on reconciliation, diversity and equality, dubbed a ‘Re-tooling’ is set for 6 p.m. at the Spirit Stage in Semiahmoo Park. It begins at 6 p.m. on Monday, July 12. Admission is free but registration is required. (unsplash.com photo)
Songhees Nation Chief Ron Sam read the South Island First Nations’ public letter, calling for solidarity and respect and an end to vandalism in the Greater Victoria region. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

Vancouver Island Indigenous leaders call for unity, end to violence, vandalism in Victoria area

A Malahat Nation totem was damaged in apparent retaliation of Capt. James Cook statue teardown

Songhees Nation Chief Ron Sam read the South Island First Nations’ public letter, calling for solidarity and respect and an end to vandalism in the Greater Victoria region. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Wenona Hall, associate professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley, with kids. (Devon Hall photography)
Wenona Hall, associate professor of Indigenous Studies at UFV, with kids. (Devon Hall photography)

Canada Day as seen through an Indigenous lens

‘Canadians need to take the time to learn what it is that we are trying to reconcile’ - Wenona Hall

Wenona Hall, associate professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley, with kids. (Devon Hall photography)
Wenona Hall, associate professor of Indigenous Studies at UFV, with kids. (Devon Hall photography)
The Delta School District is installing three-foot poles with QR codes linking to information about its Giving Tree Project and the significance of cedar trees for local Indigenous peoples at each school and district site, thanks to a pair of recent grants from the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority and the Delta Foundation. Pictured, left to right: District vice-principal of Indigenous education Diane Jubinville, Indigenous teacher mentor co-ordinator Cody Forbes, district vice-principal of academy and choice programs Paige Hansen, Indigenous educator and cultural enhancement facilitator Nathan Wilson, Indigenous teacher mentor co-ordinator Heidi Wood, and manager of Indigenous relations for the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority Dianne Sparrow. (Delta School District/submitted photo)

Pair of grants to help Delta School District enhance reconciliation project

$11,000 from Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, Delta Foundation boosts district’s Giving Tree Project

The Delta School District is installing three-foot poles with QR codes linking to information about its Giving Tree Project and the significance of cedar trees for local Indigenous peoples at each school and district site, thanks to a pair of recent grants from the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority and the Delta Foundation. Pictured, left to right: District vice-principal of Indigenous education Diane Jubinville, Indigenous teacher mentor co-ordinator Cody Forbes, district vice-principal of academy and choice programs Paige Hansen, Indigenous educator and cultural enhancement facilitator Nathan Wilson, Indigenous teacher mentor co-ordinator Heidi Wood, and manager of Indigenous relations for the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority Dianne Sparrow. (Delta School District/submitted photo)
Hundreds turned out to an event at Civic Plaza Friday (June 4) to honour the 215 Indigenous children discovered at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops. The event was hosted by Skookum Lab, part of the Surrey Urban Indigenous Leadership Committee. (Photo: Lauren Collins)

Surrey councillor plans to acknowledge First Nations communities at next meeting

Annis says it’s the ‘right and respectful thing to do’ despite mayor’s refusal to do so

Hundreds turned out to an event at Civic Plaza Friday (June 4) to honour the 215 Indigenous children discovered at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops. The event was hosted by Skookum Lab, part of the Surrey Urban Indigenous Leadership Committee. (Photo: Lauren Collins)
Semiahmoo First Nation Chief Harley Chappell says his role as a member of the new Surrey Police Service board of directors offers an opportunity to help policing in the community ‘move forward’ in terms of its interactions with the city’s First Nations people. (City of White Rock)

SFN chief considers it an honour to serve on Surrey Police Board

‘We can’t change the past, but we can learn from it,’ says Harley Chappell

Semiahmoo First Nation Chief Harley Chappell says his role as a member of the new Surrey Police Service board of directors offers an opportunity to help policing in the community ‘move forward’ in terms of its interactions with the city’s First Nations people. (City of White Rock)
CELEBRATING INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY
Council members and witnesses from the Hupacasath First Nation, left, and Tseshaht First Nation, right, prepare to raise their respective flags in front of Port Alberni City Hall on Monday, June 21, 2021. The flags will permanently fly as part of the city’s reconciliation work. See more coverage from the flag raising ceremony on page A5. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

Vancouver Island First Nations flags to fly permanently at city hall

Addition of flags are one Port Alberni response to reconciliation

CELEBRATING INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY
Council members and witnesses from the Hupacasath First Nation, left, and Tseshaht First Nation, right, prepare to raise their respective flags in front of Port Alberni City Hall on Monday, June 21, 2021. The flags will permanently fly as part of the city’s reconciliation work. See more coverage from the flag raising ceremony on page A5. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
Skeena MLA Ellis Ross. (Photo by Peter Versteege)

BC Liberal leadership candidate condemns ‘senseless violence’ of Okanagan church fires

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross says reconciliation isn’t about revenge for past tragedies

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross. (Photo by Peter Versteege)
Vancouver Island First Nations and others gather on the lawn of the legislature to honour the 215 children who never came home from a Kamloops residential school. The timing of the discovery will affect Victoria’s marking of July 1 as Canada Day this year. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)

Victoria cancels Canada Day events out of respect for First Nations

Reconciliation-based hour-long TV presentation to air later this summer, rather than July 1

Vancouver Island First Nations and others gather on the lawn of the legislature to honour the 215 children who never came home from a Kamloops residential school. The timing of the discovery will affect Victoria’s marking of July 1 as Canada Day this year. (Jake Romphf/News Staff)
A group drums under the Peace Arch monument during an international vigil at Peace Arch Park Saturday (June 5, 2021), after the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation confirmed there were remains of at least 215 Indigenous children at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops. (Photo: Lauren Collins)

Cross-border gathering at Surrey’s Peace Arch Park honours 215 Indigenous children

International mourning ceremony hosted by Lummi, Southern First Nations

A group drums under the Peace Arch monument during an international vigil at Peace Arch Park Saturday (June 5, 2021), after the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation confirmed there were remains of at least 215 Indigenous children at the site of a former residential school in Kamloops. (Photo: Lauren Collins)
A crowd gathered for a second time at Surrey City Hall on Friday (June 4) in memory of the 215 Indigenous children who lost their lives at a former residential school in Kamloops. This event was organized by the BASMODI Team, which has been organizing events in support of the Indian farmers’ protests. (Photos: Annie Ohana/Twitter)
A crowd gathered for a second time at Surrey City Hall on Friday (June 4) in memory of the 215 Indigenous children who lost their lives at a former residential school in Kamloops. This event was organized by the BASMODI Team, which has been organizing events in support of the Indian farmers’ protests. (Photos: Annie Ohana/Twitter)
The Delta School District held a ceremony at the school board office in Ladner Tuesday morning (June 1) to honour the 215 children found buried on the site of a former residential school in Kamloops and all those impacted by the residential school system. Attendees hung 215 orange hearts on cedar trees planted this spring as part of the district’s Giving Tree Project, and placed children’s shoes around the central tree. (Delta School District photo)

Delta School District honours residential school victims

215 orange hearts were hung on cedar trees, with children’s shoes placed around the central tree

The Delta School District held a ceremony at the school board office in Ladner Tuesday morning (June 1) to honour the 215 children found buried on the site of a former residential school in Kamloops and all those impacted by the residential school system. Attendees hung 215 orange hearts on cedar trees planted this spring as part of the district’s Giving Tree Project, and placed children’s shoes around the central tree. (Delta School District photo)
Delta council began with an Indigenous land acknowledgement for the first time on Monday, May 10, 2021.

Delta council opens first meeting with Indigenous land acknowledgement

Acknowledgment will be read at the start of each council/committee meeting and City of Delta event

Delta council began with an Indigenous land acknowledgement for the first time on Monday, May 10, 2021.
Delta City Hall. (James Smith photo)

Delta council meetings, public events to begin with Indigenous land acknowledgment

Metro Vancouver, eight cities in the region, Delta School District all have similar practices

Delta City Hall. (James Smith photo)
Neilson Grove Elementary students water their new cedar tree. As part of its commitment to reconciliation, the Delta School District is planting a cedar tree at every school and district site as a way to show appreciation and respect for local First Nation culture through its Giving Tree Project. (Delta School District photo)

Cedars planted at Delta schools as part of reconciliation

‘Giving Tree Project’ a way to show respect and appreciation for First Nation culture

Neilson Grove Elementary students water their new cedar tree. As part of its commitment to reconciliation, the Delta School District is planting a cedar tree at every school and district site as a way to show appreciation and respect for local First Nation culture through its Giving Tree Project. (Delta School District photo)
Bob Joseph the bestselling author of ‘21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act’ has been an enabler for discourses about the Indian Act, since his 2015 blog post about the legislation went viral. (Courtesy of Vancouver Island Regional Library)

Bob Joseph: Why the Indian Act must go and Canada will be better for it

B.C. author explores the paradox of why it’s so difficult to let the act go and why it has to happen

Bob Joseph the bestselling author of ‘21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act’ has been an enabler for discourses about the Indian Act, since his 2015 blog post about the legislation went viral. (Courtesy of Vancouver Island Regional Library)
Janet Austin, lieutenant governor of British Columbia stands by a canoe carved by former lieutenant governor Steven Point. The canoe named Shxwtitostel (pronounced: Schwe-tea-tos-tel) means “a safe place to cross the river” in Halq’eméylem and is currently on display at the B.C. Legislature building. (Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia photo)

New award launched to celebrate champions of reconciliation in B.C.

Reconciliation Award launched by Lieutenant Governor, BC Achievement Foundation

Janet Austin, lieutenant governor of British Columbia stands by a canoe carved by former lieutenant governor Steven Point. The canoe named Shxwtitostel (pronounced: Schwe-tea-tos-tel) means “a safe place to cross the river” in Halq’eméylem and is currently on display at the B.C. Legislature building. (Office of the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia photo)