Talcum powder may cause cancer, lung damage: Health Canada

Talcum powder may cause cancer, lung damage: Health Canada

Investigation reveals talc, commonly found in baby powder, could be linked to ovarian cancer

Health Canada is warning that using talcum powder may be linked to ovarian cancer.

The ministry said Wednesday it is considering further restricting the use of talc in cosmetics, non-prescription drugs and health products.

The mineral, which is commonly found in baby powder and diaper creams, was restricted in those products in 2007.

A recent Health Canada investigation found that inhaling the loose powder can damage the lungs, while using products containing talc in the female genital area increases risk of developing ovarian cancer.

A report, which is open to comments from the public, will undergo one last assessment by department staff in two months, and talc could be added to the federal list of toxic substances.

Talc does not pose any health risks in products such as food, plastics, pressed powders or presctiption drugs.

Earlier this year, a jury in St. Louis ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $4.7 billion to nearly two dozen women in a lawsuit that linked baby powder to ovarian cancer.

– With a file from The Associated Press


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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