Sickle Point on Skaha Lake.

Skaha Lake’s last intact wetland saved by Vancouver family

Sickle Point has been saved from development

Sickle Point has been saved.

As a result of the generosity and initiative of a Vancouver-based family, who has fond memories of their summers in Kaleden, combined with pledges from more than 380 individuals, Sickle Point has been saved from development, the Save Sickle Point group announced Wednesday morning.

Now the non-motorized status of the Kettle Valley Railway trail has been preserved. Skaha Lake’s last intact wetland has been purchased with the unified vision for long term conservation.

South Okanagan MP Richard Cannings and the Penticton Indian Band have campaigned against Sickle Point being developed, along with many strong supporters who have pledged money to save the rare wetlands.

The next steps include the creation of a strategic plan for restoration and rehabilitation.

The group will establish a ‘self sustaining’ endowment fund with a land trust to ensure that Sickle Point will be cared for, and well managed for its natural values, well into the future.

“This is a great day for the environment. It would not have happened without pledges and the commitment and willingness of individuals to write letters, sign petitions, put up posters and green ribbons and share information with family and friends,” wrote the Save Sickle Point Committee on their Facebook page.

“We can all be very proud of this legacy,” said the group.

More to come.

READ MORE: Save Sickle Point not giving up

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.


 

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