Raw sewage flooded Langley City daycare

The new business owner is facing a hefty repair bill.

A Langley daycare owner doesn’t know what she’s going to do about a $20,000 repair bill after raw sewage started pouring into her business.

Chelsi Taylor walked into her Bee Yourself Childcare location on 56th Avenue in Langley City on the morning of Dec. 8 to find water already flooding the ground-floor business.

At first she was worried it was a leaky water heater, but things quickly went from bad to worse.

“It was just like a fountain,” she said. “There was literally poo and toilet paper coming out of the ground.”

WATCH: Daycare owner describes impact of sewage leak

All 23 children who were to be at the daycare had to be turned away, with emergency phone calls to parents to come and pick up those already dropped off.

The entire building had to have its water shut off, as liquid began coming up in other nearby areas, including on the road.

A blockage in a sewer line out front was to blame. She believes it was linked to the paving work.

The City was relatively quick in clearing up the blockage, which stopped the immediate problem. But the whole area was now contaminated with sewer water. Bee Yourself hasn’t been able to reopen in that space since then.

After contacting her insurance company and a restoration firm, Taylor said the cost is out of her reach.

“I’m not covered for the amount of damage that was done,” she said.

She’s been told that costs for a complete restoration will be in the area of $20,000.

Taylor just began operating Bee Yourself on 56th Avenue in June. Before that she ran a smaller in-home daycare from 2014. She and her husband renovated the space themselves, spending thousands and putting in a lot of hours of work.

She hasn’t had a lot of time in her new space to build up any cash reserves for such a repair bill.

“My funds that come in from families go directly to my staff,” Taylor said.

She has managed to get Bee Yourself up and running again, renting space nearby in the Masonic Hall off Fraser Highway.

But with all the additional expenses, she’s not sure how she’ll pay for the repairs.

Taylor has been in contact with Langley City Mayor Ted Schaffer, who said he has passed on her email to Langley City administrator Francis Cheung.

Discussions with the contractor who was paving just before the flood are taking place, Schaffer said, but he said it has not yet been officially determined who was at fault.

Taylor is hoping the City or contractor will be paying for repairs. Whoever pays, her daycare will be closed for another month.

She is also facing a deadline on getting matters settled. Pregnant with twins, her due date is in early March. Taylor is hoping to sort out everything before the end of February.

 

Damage to the building included most of the flooring being destroyed.

Chelsi Taylor’s daycare has lost its flooring and parts of its walls after a sewage backup. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance)

A nearby sewage pipe showed the flow of brown water and cigarette butts.

Just Posted

Cloverdale town hall adresses climate change and loss of biodiversity

Meeting co-hosted by Cloverdale-Langley City MP John Aldag, Camp We Empower draws about 70 people

PHOTOS: Surrey designer uses toilet paper to make a dress for annual Toronto show

‘The dress is very experimental and avante garde,’ says Guildford-based Alex S. Yu

Police issue warning after four overdoses in North Delta

Police and emergency health services use naloxone to revive four overdose victims Thursday morning

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Surrey reacts to policing plan getting the green light

Former mayor, councillors and residents weigh in on the Public Safety Minister approving the transition

Trudeau vows to stand firm against ‘increasingly assertive’ China

China has accused Canada of meddling in its affairs

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town rocked by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

North Van music teacher accused of sexual misconduct involving girls

Police believe other victims could be out there after the arrest of Lamar Victor Alviar

B.C. family stranded in Croatia desperate to come home

Funds being raised to bring back mom and two children

B.C. man on trial for daughters’ murders says an intruder broke in

Andrew Berry takes stand in his defense for December 2017 deaths of young daughters

‘Plenty of time for a deal’: Teachers’ union expects kids back in school on Sept. 3

BCTF says class size, composition at the heart of the issue

Most Read