Artist Phyllis Atkins with her work, We Are All Connected to This Land, on Bear Creek Bridge in Surrey. (submitted photo)

PHOTOS: Blessing ceremony for new art on new bridge in Newton

Phyllis Atkins created ‘We Are All Connected to This Land’ for Bear Creek Bridge

The unveiling of new artwork on a bridge in Newton involved a private blessing ceremony with members of Kwantlen First Nation on Tuesday (June 11).

Phyllis Atkins’ contemporary Coast Salish work, called We Are All Connected to This Land, is installed on Bear Creek Bridge, on King George Boulevard, just south of 88th Avenue.

The work, which features depictions of salmon, a sun, an eagle, a moon and a wolf, is cut from powder-coated red aluminum and attached to the concrete barrier walls of the new bridge.

The blessing ceremony was attended by Kwantlen First Nation Chief Marilyn Gabriel and elders, artist Atkins and her family, members of the Kwantlen nation, city councillors and staff, and representatives of Brenco Industries, the company that fabricated the artwork.

(SCROLL DOWN TO SEE MORE PHOTOS)

The project is part of a series of initiatives by the City of Surrey “to include visual representations of reconciliation on civic facilities and infrastructure,” according to a news release.

Atkins’s other public artworks in Surrey include Paddling through the Waves of Change and Returning to the River, with The Rivers That Connect Us to be installed outside the Museum of Surrey later this year. She has a website at springsalmonstudio.com and operates a studio in Fort Langley.

“From salmon to four-legged animals to winged creatures, I wanted to show how we are all connected to this land,” Atkins says of We Are All Connected to This Land, the design of which was recommended by a committee of Elders of the Katzie, Kwantlen, and Semiahmoo First Nations.

Established in 1998, Surrey’s Public Art Program “contributes to the creation of a lively, beautiful, inclusive, and complete community,” according to a post at surrey.ca/publicart.

• RELATED STORIES:

Surrey gets serious about public art (photos), from 2016.

New public art installed near White Rock pier.

Eight works of Indigenous art commissioned for Surrey sites.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

 

Just Posted

Nearly 200 motorcycles take off from Cloverdale for Brenden’s Ride

Annual fundraiser supports programs that empower people with disabilities

VIDEO: 5X Festival takes over Surrey’s Central City plaza

Second annual event draws thousands of people throughout the day

Semiahmoo First Nation opens cannabis dispensary

Indigenous Bloom partners with First Nations

Cloverdale’s 5 most-read stories of the week, June 7–13

Vet leaves dead dog in freezer for 78 days, local high school goes into ‘hold and secure,’ and more

City shifts proposed transit station to King George after cancellation of LRT

Council to consider Newton Town Centre plan in fall

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Pride flag taken down by Township of Langley

Woman said she was told it was removed from her front yard because of a complaint

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read