Surrey South MLA Stephanie Cadieux (inset) is criticizing the BC NDP government for a lack of commitment to building accessible playgrounds. White Rock has one such space – Generations Playground – but it was a combined effort between the city, local firefighters and Peace Arch Hospital, rather than the provincial government. (File photos)

Surrey South MLA Stephanie Cadieux (inset) is criticizing the BC NDP government for a lack of commitment to building accessible playgrounds. White Rock has one such space – Generations Playground – but it was a combined effort between the city, local firefighters and Peace Arch Hospital, rather than the provincial government. (File photos)

NDP playground pledge a “failed promise”: Cadieux

Surrey South MLA critical of provincial government’s moves to build accessible play spaces

Surrey South MLA Stephanie Cadieux has called out the BC New Democrats for what she deems a “failed promise” to deliver universally accessible playgrounds in the province.

“Although playgrounds have been built, and while they are a slight improvement, it would be a significant exaggeration in many cases to say they are universally accessible,” Cadieux said in a Nov. 29 news release.

“Kids with disabilities are still on the sidelines.”

The average cost of a universally accessible playground, can reach upward of $250,000, the news release notes, “yet the government has announced only $105,000 maximum per playground.”

“The fault lies with John Horgan and the NDP,” Cadieux continued.

“This isn’t about blaming the hardworking parents or staff involved in planning for playgrounds. I am critical of the province for not setting criteria and not providing adequate funds to do the job.

“Students were promised universally accessible playgrounds and that is not what they have received.”

The release concludes with the line “Build it right or don’t build it at all.”

White Rock has one all-abilities park – Generations Playground at Ruth Johnson Park near Centennial Arena, though it was not built with provincial funding.

The $900,000 park – which was first pitched as an idea in 2009 – was built after years of fundraising and was a collaboration between the Peace Arch Hospital Foundation, the White Rock Firefighters Charity Association, and the City of White Rock.



editorial@peacearchnews.com

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