LGBTQ health disparity study in B.C. leads to surprise finding

Suicidal thoughts and attempts go down by half for straight males in schools with GSAs.

A leading researcher of vulnerable and marginalized adolescents including LGBTQ students said more inclusive school climates — including Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) — reduced suicides and suicide attempts by 50 per cent for straight males in B.C. last year.

Dr. Elizabeth M Saewyc called it a “surprise find.”

“Suicidal thoughts and attempts actually go down by half [for straight males] in schools with GSAs and inclusive LGBTQ policies across the province,” Dr. Saewyc said.

She was initially researching population-focused health disparities for LGBTQ people. In trying to understand the disparities, she recognized that there were much higher rates of bullying, discrimination and stigma reported among LGBTQ people. In fact, the rate of discrimination experienced by students who identify as LGBTQ is three times higher than reported by heterosexual youth.

READ MORE: John White: Bullying leaves deep scars behind

On top of suicides and suicide attempts, myriad other health conditions were notably higher for LGBTQ youth. The reduction of suicide numbers for straight males might actually be tied to inclusive actions that improve conditions and reduce the same statistic for LGBTQ students, Dr. Saewyc surmised.

“A more supportive and inclusive climate creates an overall calm, lessening stress for straight people as well as those who identify within the LGBTQ community,” Dr. Saewyc said.

“Homophobic bullying, by boys especially, is a way of policing ‘how to be a guy.’ They use it to rag on boys who don’t fit the classic macho stereotype,” Dr. Saewyc said. “What we think might be happening is, when you’ve got a climate that supports and allows a diverse way of being — that it’s OK to be gay and bi and the different ways you can manifest being gendered — it takes pressure off of straight boys, too.”

Dr. Saewyc said straight males can approach masculinity without having their credentials as a straight male questioned.

“It creates more breathing room for everyone to be more comfortable with who they are,” Dr. Saewyc said.

“Being called gay — or if people think you’re gay, even if you’re straight — has an effect on mental health,” Dr. Saewyc said.

It’s the “minority stress” that goes with being a part of a marginalized group.

“We’ve learned that some of our society gives tacit permission for some kinds of bullying or harassment. People are figuring out gender identity and fitting in… everyone wants to be unique and fit in at the same time. It can be very challenging to not be a part of the group,” Dr. Saewyc said.

“People who don’t meet stereotypical norms end up being the target for a lot of the bullying and harassment as an ‘out’ group. Picking on people is a way for some to feel like they are a part of the ‘in’ group.”

When adults in the community don’t confront the harassment and don’t model supportive and inclusive behaviour, children feel like they have tacit approval. In places where adults are speaking out against LGBTQ people, children feel like they have permission to do the same.

Further, coming out is not an option for some children because their family would not support that admission, Dr. Saewyc said. Those children face the dual dilemma of bullying and the inability to open up to their parents for support.

GSA groups work to change the climate in schools. Dr. Saewyc said when schools have GSAs in place for at least a couple of years, it changes the level of reported discrimination and brings lower levels of the health concerns that are normally the key outcomes of bullying.

“Having the GSAs run by student groups, straight students can step up and be a part of advocating for inclusion and respect,” Dr. Saewyc said.

“It’s also important to recognize and be an important bystander. If you see someone being teased or threatened because of their gender orientation, step up. For adults, we have to speak out against stigma and discrimination when we see it.”

Cyberbullying is another, more recent manifestation for LGBTQ youth.

It is theoretically less harmful because there is no physical abuse, but continuous access through texting and social media means there is nowhere to hide.

“You can’t escape it easily. Bullies feel anonymous, and they can immobilize quick a mob of trolls to jump on a particular circumstance,” Dr. Saewyc said.

On the other hand, young people who might not get support where they live can find supportive friends and others online.

“Those groups can encourage them or celebrate them for who they really are so they feel safer about coming out, where they might not have that in their local community,” Dr. Saewyc said.


@johnkwhite


john.white@castlegarnews.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Surrey RCMP investigate after girl says suspicious person followed her in Whalley

Young girl was walking in the 14400-block of 102nd avenue Wednesday morning

Surrey MLAs share stage with Sikh separatist slogan

Liberal MLAs declined to after seeing controversial banner

Canucks Autism Network ‘birthday festival’ to bring concerts, beer garden to Surrey

Single-day event in July will mark CAN’s 10th anniversary

RCMP seeks dash cam footage in Cloverdale hit and run

RCMP believe same Acura TL involved in two accidents within minutes of each other

‘Art of Dance’ show in Surrey marks International Dance Day

Annual event this Sunday at Surrey Arts Centre’s Studio Theatre

VIDEO: Police Recovered Goods auction in Surrey includes 300-plus bikes, jewelry, more

Annual event to be held Saturday, April 28 at Able Auction’s Newton location

Former Social Credit MLA dies at 88

Lyall Hanson was mayor of Vernon in 1981 and moved to provincial politics from 1986-96

B.C. set to introduce pot laws, but years of fine tuning likely: minister

Legislation regulating recreational marijuana is expected to be introduced Thursday

Canadian driver uses lawn chair as driver’s seat, gets caught

Ontario police detachment caught the male driver during a traffic stop

B.C. moves to restrict pill presses in opioid battle

Minister Mike Farnworth says federal law doesn’t go far enough

UPDATE: 83-year-old convicted murderer back in custody

RCMP have captured Ralph Whitfield Morris who escaped from Mission Institution

If you see a dog in a hot car, don’t break in: SPCA

People are being discouraged from smashing windows to free animals. The SPCA has tips on what else you can do.

Municipal election loophole will be fixed, premier says

Union, corporate donations still allowed for slate party ‘operational’ needs

Cat found stuffed in box in Dumpster in northeastern B.C.

Still alive, cat was found near Dawson Creek restrained with zip ties, legs forced behind neck

Most Read