Hospital Employees Union members rally to save jobs in Coquitlam Sunday. (HEU/Facebook)

Hospital employees’ union calls on B.C. to stop care home staff layoffs

Union calling on health ministry and Fraser Health to save jobs

A union held a rally on Sunday to call on British Columbia’s health minister and the Fraser Health Authority to stop staff layoffs at two long-term care homes in Coquitlam.

The Hospital Employees’ Union said about 150 staff were told they would lose their jobs at the Lakeshore and Madison care centres, which have both publicly funded and private beds and house nearly 200 seniors in total.

The union said the owner is switching contractors, resulting in the layoffs of care aides, licensed practical nurses, activity workers, housekeepers and food service workers.

But owner The Care Group said the contractor has decided to retire from her business, and her employees at the two centres were given layoff notices as a result.

The Care Group said it’s in the process of a selecting a new contractor, and existing staff have been encouraged to apply for jobs with the new company.

It expects most of the employees will accept employment with the new contractor and therefore the suggestion that 150 employees will lose their jobs is misleading, it said.

“We are committed to continuity in care, and expect to achieve it through this transition,” said Gavin McIntosh, the company’s director of administration and development.

McIntosh said changes in contractors do occur in the industry and the health authority itself changed contractors within its hospitals on several occasions. In those situations, the new contractor hired most of the staff who were previously in place, he said.

READ MORE: Union pleas for province to act on nursing home takeover by Chinese government

The Hospital Employees’ Union also alleges that in early May, more 100 staff at Madison and Lakeshore care homes voted to join the union, and three weeks later they received layoff notices.

Fifty housekeeping and dietary workers who were in the middle of an organizing drive at the facilities were also laid off, the union said.

“The reality is, workers at these two facilities exercised their right to join a union — and now they are without jobs,” the union’s secretary-business manager, Jennifer Whiteside, said in a statement.

“This is union-busting at the most basic level, and it’s hurting vulnerable seniors who depend on their familiar care staff.”

But McIntosh said layoff notices were provided to all the retiring contractor’s employees at those sites — those covered by the union certifications, and those not covered.

He added that if employees hired by the new contractor wish to apply for union representation under the Labour Code, that will be their right.

Whiteside said the province has a recruitment and retention problem in seniors’ care due to rampant contracting out and contract flipping. These practices destabilize care, keep wages low and create precarious work, she said.

“Retaining an experienced, well-trained workforce is critical to resident health and safety,” she said.

“We are asking the minister of health and the Fraser Health Authority, who fund contracts with these facilities, to ensure staff retain their employment without loss of compensation, hours of work or their union.”

The ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but Fraser Health said in a statement that the contractor gave notice in May that she was retiring and closing her companies later this year.

“We are committed to ensuring seniors receive the best care possible and we value the work of all health-care employees in caring for seniors in our communities,” it said.

“This is an unfortunate situation and we are taking it seriously. We are continuing our discussions with the contracted provider and we are trying to come to a solution.”

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Surrey opera singer brings Mozart’s ‘Così fan tutte’ to Vancouver stage

Nancy Hasiuk-Lay has been hailed for her ‘sparkling and crystalline vocal tone’

BREAKING: Metro Vancouver mayors cancel Surrey LRT in favour of SkyTrain

TransLink will immediately suspend work on light rail

Pedestrian airlifted following South Surrey collision

Police say initial indications are the victim was crossing mid-block when he was struck

ZYTARUK: You don’t have to wear the ribbon – but look out if you don’t

Demonize and dog-pile. If you disagree with me, you are not only wrong, you are evil. The enemy…

Cloverdale students successfully petition city for school crosswalk

Safety concerns lead to petition project, new crosswalk for students and shoppers

VIDEO: People with diabetes meet their alert dogs

A diabetic alert dog is trained to detect low blood sugar in people who have Type 1 diabetes

Ten-year sentence for man convicted of B.C. belt-strangling death

Shayne McGenn guilty of manslaughter in 2016 death of David Delaney, 63

Roy Clark, country singer, ‘Hee Haw’ star, has died

Guitar virtuoso died because of complications from pneumonia at home in Tulsa, Okla. He was 85.

Lack of funding, culture on campus biggest barriers for Indigenous students: report

Report based on nearly 300 responses found lack of support at post-secondary schools a big concern

Tinder sex assault suspect charged; additional alleged victims sought

Vincent Noseworthy of Alberta is accused of aggravated sexual assault, unlawful confinement and more

Drug-related deaths double for B.C. youth in care, advocate says

Teens say positive connections with adults key to recovery

Children’s strawberry-flavoured medicines recalled due to faulty safety cap

Three different acetaminophen syrups part of nationwide recall

Around the BCHL: Junior A cities to host World Junior tuneup games

Around the BCHL is a look at what’s happening in the league and around the junior A world.

International students hit hard by B.C. tuition fee hikes

Campaign seeks regulatory controls be imposed on post-secondary institutions

Most Read