Former B.C. TV news anchor suffers from hearing loss

Tony Parsons is speaking out about the importance of getting your hearing checked

Hearing the crisp drive of a well-struck golf ball or the sound of freshly cut grass softly crunching beneath your feet, these are just some of the things he’d been missing.

Tony Parsons, the former TV news anchor welcomed into homes around the province for decades, suffers from hearing loss.

“The chirping of the birds in the morning, running water, grass under my feet, all things that were then peripheral and I sort of was in denial as so many people are at my age,” Parsons said. “My excuse was, especially with my wife was that you mumble, and I don’t understand that.”

For possibly the past ten years, Parsons went undiagnosed with his condition and it wasn’t until he was approached by NexGen Hearing clinics to be their spokesperson that his life changed.

“I said ‘yes’, but my suggestion to them was that I don’t know anything about hearing loss because I have perfect hearing so how can I help you if I don’t know what I am talking about,” he explained.

“So, they suggested I take a hearing test and I did. I went to NexGen in Kelowna and Colin VanBergen, who is an audiologist, gave me a test and we discovered much to my dismay that I did have hearing loss, especially in the right ear.”

Audiologist Colin VanBergen said Parsons suffers from significant high-frequency hearing loss in one ear.

“High-frequency hearing loss means he is still hearing a lot of sounds that we might hear but there is a lot of sounds that he is missing — he might not hear birds chirping or blowing of a whistle.”

While low-frequency hearing loss means it is difficult to hear frequencies that are deeper or low-pitched sounds.

“When we are talking about speech information and people’s ability to understand what others are saying we have some of the speech sounds in the low frequencies, such as the vowel sounds, the ‘M’, the ‘B’, the ‘R’,” explained VanBergen.

Parsons was tested and fitted for hearing aids, something he had previously thought he did not need.

“The one thing about having the hearing aids is my wife doesn’t mumble anymore, it’s become a bit of a joke,” he laughed.

While Parsons wears glasses and regularly gets his eyes checked, he didn’t believe his hearing was something he should also look into.

“With hearing you become used to the idea that things are getting quieter and not quite as understandable because it’s a gradual process. So I think if you have any hint of a hearing loss you should go get it looked at. It doesn’t mean you are going to end up wearing hearing aids like me,” he said.

Besides the obvious dangers around hearing loss, such as not hearing a car honking to let you know its coming, or an ambulance siren so you can get out of the way, VanBergen says there are other factors too.

From depression after withdrawing from social situations as people are unable to participate due to hearing loss, to the emotional toll it can take on someone who is unable to communicate with loved ones.

“The big one, however, is dementia,” he said. “People who have mild to severe hearing loss are at an increased risk of dementia anywhere from two to five times. The research right now is a correlational study because we can’t say the hearing loss is causing dementia but we can say they are strongly associated.”

Hearing aids have also progressed in recent year; the hearing aids that Parsons wears took 10 years to develop and the company who produces it spent more than $100 million on designing the processes, which VanBergen says makes the technology incredible.

The one downside to hearing aids for Parsons is that his dog Morley enjoys it much more as a chew toy than its actual purpose.

“It’s because of the odour of the wax in your ear that the dog loves, because it’s your odour, and he just thought it was fun to chew it up.”

Hearing tests are free at NexGen clinics and take anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes to perform. For those wanting to test the hearing at home an online test is available at nexgenhearing.com and can determine if a professional consultation might benefit you.

Read more about Parsons’ story here.

Just Posted

Surrey looks to target illegal dumpers with surveillance cameras

Since 2007, illegal dumping has cost the City of Surrey more than $8.5 million dollars

Peacock trapping to commence in early September, says City of Surrey

Since plan approved in June, bylaw has focused on ensuring people no longer feed the birds, ahead of relocation

Downtown Surrey BIA announces all-candidates meetings

BIA plans three events for civic candidates this September, ahead of the Oct. 20 election

Pauline Greaves joins mayoral race in Surrey

Greaves says she will run as an independent, but ‘joining a slate is under consideration’

Retired teacher Julia Poole to run for Surrey school board

Poole says her passion is to ‘find new and different ways of engaging at-risk students and those who are physically and mentally challenged’

PHOTOS: B.C. city wakes up to darkness under wildfire smoke

The rest of the province also dealing with thick haze as smoky skies continue

Bernier diatribe against ‘extreme multiculturalism’ boosts Liberal coffers

Party spokesperson Braeden Caley says online donations doubled, social media engagement quadrupled

‘Disjointed’ system hinders British Columbia First Nations in wildfire fight

More than 550 wildfires were burning in B.C. and crews were bracing for wind and dry lightning

Castlegar bridge designed by architect of collapsed Italian bridge

Riccardo Morandi designed the Kinnaird Bridge, which is part of Highway 3.

Federal government announces over $115 million to Royal Canadian Navy

Defence Minister Harjit S. Sajjan was at Victoria’s CFB Esquimalt to announce missile system upgrades

RCMP nab prolific car thief after month-long, B.C.-wide search

A province-wide warrant was issued for Brian Robert Stephan in June for a litany of offences

Court sides with developer in Jumbo ‘substantially started’ dispute

Resort developer successfully argues 2014 decision that halted the project was unfair

Canada’s tax system unfairly favours wealthy, poll of CRA auditors suggests

Four of every five respondents think loopholes and tax credits built into the system benefit the rich

Banff’s Sunshine ski resort upset with proposed guidelines from Parks Canada

The plan would allow for more visitors but wouldn’t let Sunshine build additional facilities

Most Read