Cloverdale-Langley City MP John Aldag introduced legislation today, seeking to include Indigenous representation on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. (John Aldag photo)

Cloverdale-Langley City MP introduces bill to include Indigenous representatives on heritage board

Bill C-374 is John Aldag’s first Private Member’s Bill.

On Wednesday, Cloverdale-Langley City MP John Aldag introduced his first Private Member’s Bill to the House of Commons, in an effort to amend the Historic Sites and Monuments Act to include representatives from the Indigenous peoples of Canada.

The bill, titled “C-374, An Act to amend the Historic Sites and Monuments Act,” seeks to add three new representatives to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, one for the First Nations, Metis and Inuit.

The Historic Sites and Monuments Act currently provides a representative from each province and territory to the board. There is no formal representation of Indigenous peoples, organizations or governments on the board, which has existed for nearly 100 years.

The board has advised the Canadian government on the heritage designation of places, persons and events that have shaped Canada’s history since 1919.

It receives about 70 new nominations for desgniations a year, and it considers any nomination that demonstrates its influence on Canadian history. The program’s current priorities are to recognize under-represented stories of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples, women and diverse ethnocultural communities.

“I believe it is necessary to increasingly break down the walls of exclusion which have historically existed between the Federal Government and Indigenous peoples in Canada,” said Aldag, who managed parks and historic sites at Parks Canada for 32 years before becoming an MP in 2015.

“It is my belief that the restriction of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada to only recognize provinces and territories within our Canadian system is an outdated legacy of Canada’s historic mistreatment and structural exclusion of Indigenous peoples to full acknowledgement in Canadian society.”

The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation released a statement in support of Bill C-374.

“Central in the work of reconciliation is this is the recognition that Canada, as a nation, has not accurately or effectively portrayed the perspectives of indigenous peoples in the telling of our collective history,” the statement reads. “So long as this continues, Canadians and visitors to this country will be prevented from knowing not only who we were, but will be denied an understanding of what we can become.

“Including indigenous perspectives and histories in commemorating national historic sites is paramount. Ensuring there is a clear strategy to commemorate and honour community perspectives on the residential schools is in our national interest.”



editor@cloverdalereporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

White Rock breaks temperature record

B.C. city was the hottest in all of Canada

After nearly 100 years in the field, Cloverdale farm recognized for agricultural leadership

Surrey Board of Trade awards Heppell’s Potato Corp with leadership award

First look at Cloverdale Athletic Park’s future field house

Field house part of $5.8-million revitalization project

‘Sophisticated’ mail theft, fraud operation uncovered in Cloverdale, say RCMP

Three have been arrested, charges have yet to be laid

South Surrey church members ‘praying for accused mother… for the whole process’

Lisa Batstone’s second-degree murder trial continues this week in B.C. Supreme Court

Trudeau offers to help Pacific islands face climate change impact

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau met with the leaders from the Pacific island nations on Saturday during the APEC Summit in Papua New Guinea

BC Minister of Agriculture loses stepson to accidental overdose

Lana Popham announces death of her 23-year-old stepson, Dan Sealey

Canadian military’s template for perfect recruits outdated: Vance

Gen. Jonathan Vance, the chief of defence staff says that the military has to change because the very nature of warfare is changing, particularly when it comes to cyber-warfare

‘Toxic’ chosen as the Word of the Year by Oxford Dictionaries

Other top contenders for 2018 include ‘gaslighting’ and ‘techlash’

RCMP bust illegal B.C. cannabis lab

Marijuana may be legal but altering it using chemicals violates the Cannabis Act

1 woman dead, man in hospital after ‘suspicious’ crash: police

Homicide investigators and Burnaby RCMP are investigating the fatal collision

Canada defeats Germany 29-10 in repechage, moves step closer to Rugby World Cup

Hong Kong needs a bonus-point win over Canada — scoring four or more tries — while denying the Canadians a bonus point

Avalanche Canada in desperate need of funding

The organization provides avalanche forecasting for an area larger than the United Kingdom

5 B.C. cities break temperature records

Parts of B.C. remain warm, at 10 C, while others feeling chilly

Most Read