Weather Canada says a snow storm is on the way for the Lower Mainland.

City plans for snow storm

Surrey Road crews will hit the major routes first, then second-priority roads, then the rest

As a pending storm closes in, Surrey road crews are scrambling to make sure people have clear roads.

Not all of them will be treated, at least not at first.

Surrey, as with most cities, clears main arterial roads first, then covers others in predetermined priorities.

Snow routes are prioritized based on traffic volume, speed, road classification, road terrain, transit and emergency services. These operations include salting, sanding operations during deteriorating weather conditions.

They also include snow ploughing when snow accumulations reaches 100mm (4 inches), which is expected to hit this area late Thursday.

First Priority Routes: Major roads, such as arterial roads, major collector roads, and bus routes and roads with steep hills (regardless of road classification). Roads fronting and/or leading to schools and long-term care facilities are also included.

Second Priority Routes: Snow and ice operations will continue onto second priority routes only after adverse weather conditions subside and all first priority routes are cleared for safe motor vehicle passage. During short snow storms, second and third priority routes rarely receive service due to the time required to address first priority/major routes.

Second Priority Routes are local connector roads in residential areas. These roads are usually over 200 meters in length and connect local traffic with either an arterial or major collector roadway.

All second priority work is performed during normal work hours only.

Third Priority Routes: All remaining local residential roads.

Third Priority Routes will only be maintained after all first and second priority routes are completed and driving conditions are deemed to be safe on those priority routes. The general manager of engineering uses his discretion in determining if third priority work is required. Third Priority work is carried out during normal work hours only.

In the event that bad weather conditions return during clearing of second and third priority routes, resources and equipment will revert back to focusing solely on first priority routes.

Download the City of Surrey’s Snow and Ice Route Map.

Anti-Icing Program: The City Anti-Icing program is engaged to treat the surfaces of major arterial roads in advance of forecasted snow/ice conditions. Anti-icing includes applying a brine solution which dries on roads with the leftover salt working immediately when snow begins to fall or when freezing temperatures occur. This approach effectively reduces or slows down the accumulation of snow and ice on treated pavement surfaces.

Any inquiries regarding the City’s Snow & Ice Control Operations can be placed at the City of Surrey’s Engineering-Operations Division at 604-591-4152 or submit your inquiry online.

 

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