B.C. mom says shift change meant no child care, alleges discrimination

Nicole Ziegler filed the complaint with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal against Pacific Blue Cross

A British Columbia mother says her employer discriminated against her when it changed her shift without giving her enough time to find child care for her one-year-old son, forcing her to find another job.

Nicole Ziegler filed the complaint with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal against Pacific Blue Cross, alleging the shift change amounted to discrimination on the basis of family status.

Pacific Blue Cross is denying any discrimination and has applied to have the complaint dismissed without a hearing, however the tribunal has denied that request.

The tribunal’s June 22 decision to allow the hearing says Ziegler told the company there are long waitlists for daycare, and it’s typical for facilities to require a minimum of two months notice of any changes to care.

It says the company told Ziegler the changes to its schedule were well within standard business hours and the company was not in a position to accommodate employee preferences.

Neither Ziegler nor Pacific Blue Cross could immediately be reached for comment.

The Canadian Press


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