‘House of Horrors’ promises 20 nights of Halloween terror

Potters House of Horrors, one of the most anticipated fall frights, and a Surrey favourite, opens this Friday night.

Now in its 11th year

Potters House of Horrors, one of the most anticipated fall frights, and a Surrey favourite, opens this Friday night.

Twenty nights of Nights of Fright runs Oct. 11 to 31 at Potters’ 12530 72 Avenue location.

Now in its 11th year, creators promise this year’s labyrinth will be bloodier and scarier than ever before “and just downright horrifying.”

It’s a heck of a sales pitch, but the Ghoul Crew at Potters have cottoned onto a winning formula, because the annual attraction draws upwards of 20,000 visitors to the totally transformed garden centre.

Dozens of people work behind the scenes – and in the scenes – at the 10,000 square-foot, 24-room spectacle each evening.

The attraction features computer-controlled lighting, sound, and animatronics, adding to the effect. Makeup experts are also brought in to work with the actors.

This year’s hair-raising house of horrors includes zombies feasting on their victim, Slither the gigantic snake-zilla, and much more.

It takes more than six weeks to put it all together, and another two weeks to take it all down again, making it the second largest Halloween event in B.C., just behind the PNE’s Fright Nights.

The Ghoul Crew begins assembling the sets in the summer. The crew began posting updates and photos on the Potters House of Horrors Facebook page, posting updates as early as July.

Fans have been treated with such teasers as video clips of a monstrosity alarmingly titled Sewer Troll, pictures of Kong the Conqueror, references to Quake City, and a picture of exposed brains dripping with blood inside a freshly-broken cranium – particularly realistic and gruesome.

The lineups are legendary, so be prepared to wait. Not that you’ll be bored; actors in makeup rove through the crowd, which can be plenty freaky to the uninitiated.

Or, purchase a speed pass, an option that costs more, but lets visitors skip the long queue.

Scaredy-cats and families with small children are advised to visit during the first hour each day, starting at 6 p.m., with the full-blown freakout, complete with actors and animatronics, springing to life at 7 p.m.

Operating hours are 6 to 10 p.m. nightly through Oct. 31.

Admission varies. From Oct. 11 to 17, and from Oct. 20 to 24, it’s $15 for adults (Speed Pass $25), and $10 for children 12 and under. Between Oct. 18 and 19, and Oct. 25 to 31, it’s $17 for adults (Speed Pass $35), and $12 for kids aged 12 and under.

All tickets for family hour are $10, with admission up to 6:45 p.m.

Visit pottershouseofhorrors.com – because even the website is scary – or call 604-572-7706.

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