Flute ensemble returning to North Delta’s Firehall Centre for the Arts

On Sunday, Nov. 20, the 11-piece Fluterrific will perform a variety of music ranging from classical to Celtic to Latin to Broadway.

Eleven-peice flute ensemble Fluterrific plays the Firehall Centre for the Arts on Nov. 20. (From left: Leslie McDougall

Following sold out performances in back-to-back years, local flute ensemble Fluterrific is returning for its third annual concert at North Delta’s Firehall Centre for the Arts.

On Sunday, Nov. 20, the 11-piece band will perform a variety of music ranging from classical to Celtic to Latin to Broadway on nine different instruments, with a few surprises thrown in for good measure.

“This 3rd annual concert has become our focal point for the year. We’re pulling out all the stops to bring the most entertaining and mixed program we can,” said band leader Michelle Carlisle, who founded the group in the early 2000s. “The Firehall is a cozy, intimate venue, perfect for such a concert. Audience members can be close to the musicians and even participate in a bit of trivia throughout the show.”

Carlisle, who has played the flute for 35 years and is a part of seven bands or ensembles, said concerts in the community are always a positive experience.

“North Delta is like a small town nestled in a big city (Greater Vancouver). It reminds me of my small Saskatchewan hometown, a warm and welcoming place. Shows like this prove support for the arts, local musicians and business people making a living here.”

The Fluterrific ensemble concert Nov. 20 at the Firehall Centre for the Arts features a variety of flutes, including C flutes, bass flutes, alto flutes, piccolos.

The Fluterrific ensemble concert Nov. 20 at the Firehall Centre for the Arts features a variety of flutes, including C flutes, bass flutes, alto flutes, piccolos. Photo credit: Michelle Carlisle

Flutes have a long tradition. The oldest ones unearthed were created from bones thousands of years ago and were used in hunting and magic rituals. During the 16th century, the use of wood or bamboo morphed them into the modern flute and, over time, more and more keys were added to enhance both sound and tuning.

“The flute is an extension of myself,” Carlisle said. “I sing without words; I soar with a melody; play a fast jig or reel; delight audiences who want to tap their toes. I play music from multiple areas of the world, and different eras of our history, all with one instrument.”

In addition to teaching kids how to play, Carlisle thrives by creating arrangements for her ensembles.

“Each year, at this concert, we do one piece I’ve written. It is a treat to hear my music played by such a fine collection of flute players. This time the tune is ‘On the Up and Up,’” Carlisle said. “I share the melody among performers. The audience hears melodies pop in and out of different parts of the group.”

The concert starts at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door or in advance by calling 604-596-4485. Kids 10 and under free.

 

Just Posted

Residents getting chance to tell Surrey council what they think of draft budget

We’ll be reporting live from Finance Committee meeting, set to begin at 4 p.m. at Surrey City Hall

Row, row, row your car, down a Surrey road

In case you haven’t noticed, it’s raining outside

‘Urgent’ need for toys, cash at Surrey Christmas Bureau depot

A record 1,924 families registered with organization, at old Stardust site

Cloverdale trauma coach’s first book focuses on hope and recovery

Manyi Ebot experienced her own share of trauma, and hopes her story and research can help others

Power outage in South Surrey and White Rock

More than 3,000 customers impacted

Heavy rain, wind cause power outages in White Rock

Chance of showers throughout the evening

Flooding shuts down Columbia Station on Expo Line

TransLink says riders will be bused to connecting Expo and Millennium Line stations

UBCO prof pitches passenger rail service in Okanagan

UBC Okanagan engineering prof envisions tram train from Okanagan to Kamloops

Famous giant tortoise DNA may hold fountain of youth: UCBO

After Lonesome George’s death he still provides clues to longer life

Oogie Boogie, Sandy Claws and coffin sleigh part of B.C. couple’s holiday display

Chilliwack couple decorates their house for the holidays using Nightmare Before Christmas theme

First Nation sues Alberta, says oilsands project threatens sacred site

Prosper Petroleum’s $440-million, 10,000-barrel-a-day plans have been vigorously opposed by Fort McKay

North Okanagan site of first RCMP naloxone test project

Free kits, training to be provided to high-risk individuals who spend time in cell blocks

1 arrested after bizarre incident at U.S.-B.C. border involving bags of meth, car crash

Man arrested after ruckus in Sumas and Abbotsford on Thursday night

More B.C. Indigenous students graduating high school: report

70% of Indigenous students graduated, compared to 86% across all B.C. students

Most Read