Apples are picked for the community harvest program operated by Sources Community Resources Society. (submitted photo)

Apples are picked for the community harvest program operated by Sources Community Resources Society. (submitted photo)

Have fruit trees not harvested? SOURCES wants to get you into gleaning, to help feed hungry

‘Tree owners also stand to gain from healthier trees, better fruit, and bigger yields, so it’s a win-win’

Have fruit trees you don’t harvest on your property in Surrey or White Rock?

If so, SOURCES wants to work with you.

The organization, otherwise known as Sources Community Resources Society is back for a third year with its Community Harvest program, also known as gleaning.

That’s when unwanted or leftover crops are harvested for charitable use. In urban areas, it often includes harvesting fruits from residential properties, such as cherries, plums, apples or pears.

“Our community harvest program is part of a larger effort to prevent good food from being wasted and redirect it to food banks and local community meals,” says Denise Darrell, SOURCES executive director.

“Tree owners also stand to gain from healthier trees, better fruit, and bigger yields, so it’s a win-win. Food programs that work with vulnerable populations benefit by receiving an increase of fresh nutritious foods.”

Fruit tree owners and volunteers can get involved online, on sourcesbc.ca/our-services/food-hub. The SOURCES Food Hub team can be contacted by email (foodhub@sourcesbc.ca) or phone (604-318-7426).

Since June 2019, the organization has “rescued and redistributed” the equivalent of almost 452,000 meals in Surrey, according to a web post. “That is worth the food dollar value of $1,324,655.58 of perfectly good food!”

Here’s how it works:

SOURCES requests that tree owners contact them well in advance of their fruit coming ripe, as it takes about a week to organize a harvest. When SOURCES staff receive a request, they arrange a date with the tree owner, and then organize a team of vetted volunteers. Trained, and covered by the charity’s liability insurance, the volunteers bring all the necessary equipment to the residence and harvest the produce. The produce is then shared in thirds between the tree owner, the team of volunteers, and the Sources Food Banks or other local charity with a need.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter