Past members and council members of Job’s Daughters Bethel #52 pose for a group picture at the 50th birthday celebration.

Fifty years of sisterhood

Job's Daughters Bethel #52 holds a special birthday celebration.

It was a day for old friends and familiar faces on Nov. 7 as Job’s Daughters Bethel #52 held a celebration – its 50th anniversary.

Past and fraternal members flipped through albums and scrapbooks filled with memories of the past half-century, and enjoyed reminiscing.

Job’s Daughters is an international fraternal organization for girls aged 10 to 20 that teaches leadership, teamwork, and public speaking.

It’s a place to make life-long friends, according to Tara Porter, who met one of her best friends in ‘Jobies’ 31 years ago – at the age of 12.

Jobies can be found across B.C., and around the world, with chapters in Canada, the U.S., Australia, Philippines and Brazil, making it the second-largest organization for girls in the world, according to Porter.

At least 100 people turned out for the celebration, including past Honour Queens, past members and council members.

The Honour Queen holds a six-month term as Bethel leader and members run their own meetings with the support of adults on a council.

Porter joined because she was shy, and wanted to emerge from her shell by meeting new friends – which she did, not just in her home Bethel – but across the Lower Mainland.

http://webpapersadmin.bcnewsgroup.com/portals/uploads/cloverdale/.DIR288/wBethel-pix.jpg“Because of my years in Jobies, I am able to organize events, speak in front of large groups of people, respect people, my community and my country,” she says.

These days, she’s involved as a parent: her daughter joined a year ago. “People typically get involved because they know someone in Job’s Daughters or have heard of us,” she says.

Its roots as an organization date back to 1920, and its purpose is to band together young girls with Masonic ties to build character and moral and spiritual development, reverence for God and the Holy Scriptures, flag and country, and respect for parents and guardians.

Current members live in Langley and Surrey, and past members live across the country, including Porter, who lived in New Brunswick for 16 years.

“Job’s Daughters is a wonderful organization where girls have fun and learn skills that will serve them for the rest of their lives,” she says.

The group opens up a world of opportunity. Members learn leadership skills, develop public speaking and positive self-esteem, and gain experience running business meetings, planning events, doing community service work, and learning respect for others.http://webpapersadmin.bcnewsgroup.com/portals/uploads/cloverdale/.DIR288/wBethelbrowse.jpg

Meetings are twice a month, and there are plenty of other events, from attending other Bethel meetings to movie nights, sleep overs, and laying a wreath on Remembrance Day.

“We have a lot of fun.”

There are some open meetings where girls can find out more. Look for Bethel #52 at the North Otter Elementary School craft fair on Nov. 28 and they’ll be face-painting at Alice Brown Elementary School on Dec. 12.

To join, contact your local Bethel. Applicants can be related to a Mason – or sponsored by one.

 

Follow the Cloverdale Reporter on Twitter and Facebook. View our print edition online.

Just Posted

White Rock Renegades ‘04 named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

PHOTOS: Supercars parade to White Rock

More than a dozen cars were on display for the Drive Project

South Surrey woman promotes exercise to help fight Parkinson’s disease

‘This keeps me strong’ says Liz Holroyd Campbell, organizer of the 2019 Parkinson Superwalk

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

B.C. VIEWS: Log exports and my other errors so far in 2019

Plastic bags, legislature overspending turn out differently

Most Read