Aaron Hinks photo South Surrey entrepreneur Justin Lloyd is marketing a kit that creates edible-cannabis candy.

South Surrey entrepreneur teaches how to make cannabis-infused candy

Justin Lloyd started Kickstarter campaign for The Edibles Kit

A South Surrey business owner has created an educational package that teaches first-time, or experienced cannabis consumers how to turn the weed into an edible candy.

Justin Lloyd launched a Kickstarter Campaign for The Edibles Kit, with a goal of raising $10,000. As of Sunday afternoon, the campaign raised nearly $700.

The kit teaches adults how to create THC-infused (the principal psychoactive constituent of cannabis) butter, honey, coconut oil or candies.

The product, which comes in a rectangular box, includes instructions, candy moulds, a candy thermometer and brush. It retails for $34.99.

Although the sale of edible cannabis products is illegal in Canada, adults are allowed to make edibles themselves. The BC Cannabis Stores website sells dried flower as well as THC-infused oils, which can be used for cooking or baking.

The Edibles Kit does not include cannabis.

Lloyd said one of the problems with making, or even trying an edible cannabis product, is that there’s a risk with not knowing the potency.

“I’ve heard more often than not, people in college or university, having bad experiences. How common is that? The problem is that people will try it from people who had never made them before, or made them but made them far too potent.”

Lloyd said his kit teaches an adult how to properly dose THC.

“So if they want a very mild candy or edible, let’s say just to go to sleep or relax, this is what this does.”

Lloyd said he saw the benefit of micro-dosing THC first-hand.

Lloyd said his grandmother, who is in her mid-80’s, had a spinal fusion and as a result, has trouble sleeping.

“She never used cannabis in her life, never smoked it, ate it, anything,” Lloyd said. “You know, the whole reefer madness culture. I finally decided to ask her if she ever considered cannabis.”

Lloyd suggested that he travel to his grandmother’s house, stay at her place and make cannabis candy with her. He agreed to stay the night and sleep in the living room.

“I made sure to test the potency, obviously, because this is my grandma. Having tested it, I made it as mild as I could,” he said.

When his grandmother began to feel tired, Lloyd suggested that she go to sleep, and come see him in the living room if she had any questions.

“The next morning she comes out and I’m biting my nails. I really hope my nanny is OK,” Lloyd said.

“She came out and just smiled and said that’s the best sleep she’s had in 10 years, and she didn’t need her walker to take the garbage out.”

Lloyd clarified that “by no means” is he a doctor or recommending that people try THC.

“But I do know that because it’s legal, if people know how to cook it properly if you have trouble sleeping – I’ve witnessed it work.”

The kit is currently available at the Buddha Barn (2179 4 Ave.) in Vancouver.

“I’m not going to say how strong you should make it, but here’s a formula so you know how strong or weak to make it. It’s more about educating people on how to do it properly and removing the stigma of ‘lets get high…’ to ‘maybe I just need a better night’s sleep.’”

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