Delta teen wounded by paintball fired from vehicle on Scott Road

‘They heard the ‘pop, pop, pop’ of shots, and he thought at first that he was actually shot,’ mom says

DELTA — A North Delta teen has a serious gash on his ribcage after being struck by a paintball fired from a vehicle Tuesday afternoon (Oct. 3).

He was on his bike on a Scott Road sidewalk, south of 64th Avenue on the Delta side, when the incident happened at around 4:30 p.m. A friend was walking with him at the time.

Jenny Macleod is the mother of the struck boy, named James, 14.

“They heard the ‘pop, pop, pop’ of shots, and he thought at first that he was actually shot, by a bullet, because of so many drive-by shootings in the neighbourhood, in Surrey,” Macleod told the Now-Leader. “And then his friend told him, ‘There’s paint all over your shirt.’”

Macleod posted details of the incident on Facebook, along with photos of her injured son.

“I am so upset right now (that) some immature kid thought it was funny, but (he) could have caused him serious injuries had he had fallen off his bike into the road or into a post,” Macleod wrote Tuesday.

“He is understandably upset and nervous. I am so raging right now.”

James was taken to hospital for treatment of a wound that will take at least a couple of weeks to heal, Macleod said.

A report with police has been filed, she said, with a vague description of the suspect vehicle.

“His friend just said it was a white sports-type car, and my son didn’t even see the car. They couldn’t even tell if there was, like, one or four people in the car,” Macleod said.

She added: “You tell your kids to make sure they’re safe – you know, make sure you’re with other people at all times, make sure you stick to the main roads, and now they’re like, ‘No, we’re nervous, we don’t want to go on the main roads, we’ll stay on the back roads,’” Macleod said. “But I don’t know, it could have happened on the back road, too. And maybe they weren’t the only ones targeted. Maybe a dog got shot at, maybe an old lady was shot, we don’t know.”

She added: “You tell your kids to make sure they’re safe – you know, make sure you’re with other people at all times, make sure you stick to the main roads, and now they’re like, ‘No, we’re nervous, we don’t want to go on the main roads, we’ll stay on the back roads.”