Bacon trial postponed until 2016

Accused in Surrey Six slayings will have been in jail for seven years awaiting trial by the time his next court date rolls around.

The trial for Surrey Six accused Jamie Bacon has been postponed until late 2016.

The trial for Jamie Bacon has been postponed for more than a year due to a lengthy pre-trial process.

Bacon, on trial in relation to the Surrey Six slayings in October 2007, was due to be in court on Sept. 2 on one count of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder.

The so-called Surrey Six slayings at Balmoral Tower in Whally left six dead, including two innocent bystanders – Chris Mohan of Surrey and Ed Schelleberg of Abbotsford.

On Tuesday, July 28, the trial was put forward to Oct. 31, 2016 – seven years after Bacon was arrested in connection with the crime.

“A number of factors (caused the postponement), but that included that there’s additional time that’s expected to be needed to deal with some additional pre-trial applications as well as dealing with issues arising from disclosure by Crown of some privileged material,” said Neil MacKenzie, spokesman for the provincial criminal justice branch.

A ban on publication is in place on any of the pre-trial motions that are causing the delays.

The trial itself is expected to last for six to nine months.

To this point, four people have been convicted, or have pleaded guilty, to a role in the murders of Corey Lal, his brother Michael, associates Ryan Bartolomeo and Eddie Narong, and Schellenberg and Mohan.

Last December, Cody Haevischer and Matthew Johnston were sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty of six counts of first-degree murder and one count of conspiracy.

They are appealing their convictions.

In 2013, Michael Le pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit murder and was sentenced to 12 years.

One person, who can only be identified as Person X by court order, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in 2009 for three of the murders and was sentenced to life with no parole for 15 years.

The lengthy wait for trial isn’t likely to benefit Bacon.

In non-murder trials, time in custody prior to trial often counts as double time when sentencing is given.

However, that’s not the case in murder trials. Typically, time served will come off the time required for parole eligibility.

For murder charges, time spent in jail prior to a conviction is counted as straight time.