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BREAKING: Santa's sleigh spotted

Ho ho ho... it
Ho ho ho... it's Santa!
— image credit:

Santa's on his way.
He left the North Pole in his reindeer-powered sleigh early this morning to deliver gifts to the children of the world, officials at NORAD have confirmed.
NORAD radar is tracking Rudolph's bright red nose, and satellite imagery is providing minute-by-minute coverage of Santa's location as he makes his magical Christmas Eve journey, delivering gifts to the children of the world.
Santa Cams – high-tech, high-speed digital cameras pre-positioned through the world – are also capturing Santa's journey.
The results are being posted throughout the day on NORAD's Santa Tracker website, www.noradsanta.org, where you can also watch the number of gifts delivered add up in real time.
The page is being updated throughout the day, making it easy to find out where he's been and where's he's headed for next.
It’s known from Santa Cam images that he uses a herd of flying reindeer for quick transportation, but detailed information remains elusive after all these years.
“The fact that Santa Claus is more than 16 centuries old, yet does not appear to age, is our biggest clue that he does not work within time as we know it,” the Santa Tracker website says.
“His Christmas Eve trip may seem to take around 24 hours, but to Santa it may last days, weeks or even months in standard time,” it says.
"Santa would not want to rush the important job of distributing presents to children and spreading Christmas happiness to everyone, so the only logical conclusion is that Santa functions within a different time-space continuum than the rest of us do."
The tradition of tracking Santa began in 1955, when children began calling CONAD, the predecessor to NORAD, hoping to speak with Santa Claus.
A misprint in a department store advertisement resulted in a big mix-up.
Children dialing Santa’s telephone number were mistakenly put through to the CONAD Commander-in-Chief’s operations “Hotline” instead.
The original "Santa Tracker," the late Col. (retired) Harry Shoup of the U.S. Air Force, the director-in-chief at the time, had his staff check the radar for signs that Santa was making his way south from the North Pole, the site says.
“Children who called were given updates on his location, and a tradition was born.”

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