Surrey, now and then

Compare archival photos with modern images of Surrey in fall 2011 Surrey Archives series.

180.1.53 Liquor Store line-up c. 1926

Over the past decade, the City of Surrey has seen intense levels of new residential and commercial growth.

That’s particularly true in Cloverdale, where the population is 53,000 and growing – 21,000 of those residents are new arrivals who moved here in the past decade.

But the historic town centre – Surrey’s original city centre – has retained much of its character and heritage, despite being surrounded by growth.

See how much all of Surrey has changed – and what’s remained the same – in Surrey: Then and Now, first up in the Surrey Archives’ 2011 fall program series.

The Oct. 15 presentation features a visually stunning presentation comparing archival photos with modern images in Surrey, which has grown from an overall population of 70,000 in 1960 to 480,000 today.

It’s the first of four one-hour, public programs (held between 11 a.m. and noon Saturdays) exploring a different facet of Surrey’s history each week.

Next up Oct. 22 is Royal Metal, where railway historian and author Barrie Sandford will reveal the history and significance of the 1903 New Westminster  Rail Bridge.

 Surrey’s Early Schools is a look back at the days when schools consisted of only one room. Cloverdale Public School, built on the current archives site, was a one-room school built in 1906, but was moved a block east to where Cloverdale Traditional School is today. Historian Jack Brown will trace the history of Surrey’s early schools, Saturday, Nov. 5.

Surrey in the 1930s is a step back in time to The Dirty Thirties. It will explore what life was like for Surrey residents during the Great Depression. Saturday, Nov. 12.

The programs are $10 each or just $35 if you sign up for all four.

Visit www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/2398.aspx or call the Surrey Museum at 604-592-6956, or call Surrey PRC PhoneReg at 604-501-5100.

Presented at the Surrey Archives, 17671 56 Avenue in Surrey.

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